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April 22, 1994 - Image 104

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1994-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

JOIN US FOR OUR
7TH ANNUAL
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, APRIL 24
1 -3 PM

Next Generation

"X" page 103

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Hours: Monday-Friday 7am-7pm; Saturday 8 am-5pm

855-4870
29571 Orchard Lake Rd., N. of 13 Mile Rd. next to ABC Warehouse

Holocaust Survivors!!

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104

If you receive health damage pensions from
Germany and wish to lodge a claim for aggra-
vation of your state of health; if you worked in
the ghetto of Lodz; if you have children born
before 1949-
Please get in touch with:

A. Scoczylas
6309 Rose Blvd.
WEST BLOOMFIELD, Mich. 48322
Phone (810) 8559698

Name: Scott J. Winnick
Age: 30
Status: Married to Lisa
Weinshenker
Occupation: Runs a
general-practice law
firm in Windsor.
Residence: Windsor
Quote: "It's difficult to
meet young married couples
because most of the couples
groups we've found are
made up of people between
35 and 40 years old. They
tend to have their own com-
munity or niche and it's
hard to break into that
niche."

The term, coined by author
Douglas Coupland in his book
Generation X, has been used
interchangeably. Depending
on whose definition is applied,
Generation X can refer to not
only a range of age groups
(somewhere between 13 and 33
depending on whom you talk
to), but also means different
things to different people.
While some look at Generation
Xers as hardworking and mo-
tivated, others are not so pos-
itive.
Negative stereotypes like
lazy, materialistic and selfish
are often used to describe these
young adults.
Frederick Marx, of Marx
Layne, a Southfield marketing
and public-relations firm, is not
a member of the X Generation,
but a majority of his employ-

ees are. He also disagrees with
the negative stereotypes often
given to these young adults.
"I see a very strong work
ethic and a lot of dedication,"
Mr. Marx says. "I see them
come into the office on week-
days wearing pressed shirts
and polished shoes and on the
weekends they wear baseball
hats.
"I think the X Generation is
very demanding of answers
and they know how to express
themselves. They know how to
work the system; they are used
to choices and are concerned
about society."
Unlike their predecessors,
this generation does not have
heroes.
"We're more skeptical of
leaders and people in the lime-
light," Mr. White says.
These young adults will be
required to solve problems like
AIDS, the national debt, in-
creasing racial tension, disin-
tegration of the family and the
decay of the environment. Al-
though these issues are not
new, they are peaking as this
generation comes of age.
In addition, this is the only
generation born since the Civ-
il War that, on the average,
will not make more money
than their parents.
"It's tough with all the land
mines that are out there," Mr.
Marx said. "Safety is also a big
issue. Kids are getting car
phones not for status but for
security."
In the past, a college diplo-
ma was almost an automatic
ticket to a good-paying and
well-respected job. Now, at-
tending a graduate school is
imperative, but getting into a
grad program is a whole other
story.
The bottom line for this gen-
eration is that society is more
complex than ever before. But
that doesn't stop them from
trying to have fun.

The Next Generation
will be a monthly
The
feature in
Jewish News.

Name: Betsy Moss
Age: 32
Occupation: Math teacher
Residence: West Bloomfield
Quote: "Now I'm at a point
that I've established myself in
my career and I feel that I'm
now beginning to enjoy my
life. Getting involved in so-
cial events and committee
work brings a necessary bal-
ance to my life and makes me
a more well-rounded person."

Name:
Lisa Weinshenker
Age: 27
Status: Married to
Scott Winnick
Occupation: Clinical
psychology graduate
student
Residence: Windsor
Quote: We have en-
joyed being involved in
the Detroit Jewish com-
munity. There are a lot
of events that go on here.
Although we live in
Windsor, we spend a lot
of time running around
in West Bloomfield or
Farmington Hills."

Name: Nathan White
Age: 22
Status: Single
Occupation: Medical
student
Residence: Southfield
Quote: "This year has been
a big adjustment. I went
from U-M and having a lot
of friends and Jewish stu-
dents around to having
most of my friends living
out of state. Now I'm
pressed for time and it's
hard to go out with friends
because we're so spread
out."

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