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April 15, 1994 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1994-04-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Lakeside Lexus Rols Back Prices Beyond 1990!

Tell Mc W

That Was Then.

In 1990
A LS400 Leased For

A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I Know
A Writer From Kalamazoo

ELIZABETH APPLEBAUM ASSOCIATE EDITOR

This Is Now.

TODAY

A 94 LS400 Leases For

'599

44: Why are two
candles lit on Shabbat?

The two candles are lit for the two different
commandments God gave the Jewish people
A
regarding the Sabbath.

.

In Deuteronomy 5:12, the Jews are directed to
observe the Sabbath. In Exodus 20:8, they are told to
remember the Shabbat.
Holidays also are referred to at times as Sabbaths,
which is why Jewish women light two candles before
Rosh Hashanah, Pesach and other holy days.

Congregation
Tchiyah candles.

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36 months

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The Heights, Dearborn Heights • (313) 274-8200
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(On comer of Hall Road and Hayes Road)
Merri-Five Plaza, Livonia • (313) 522-1850
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Woodland Mail, Grand Rapids • (616) 957-2145

44: Were any famous Jewish authors born in
Kalamazoo?

Edna Ferber, without whom there nev-
er would have been a Show Boat, was a
A
native of that thriving Jewish metropolis in west-

.

ern Michigan.
Ferber was born in 1887 at 817 S. Park St. in
a home built by her father. (Today, an apartment
complex sits on the unmarked site.)
As a girl, Ferber moved with her family to Wis-
consin. Her years there became the subject of her

autobiography, A Peculiar Treasure.
Ferber, who died in 1968, worked for many
years as a newspaper reporter before finding fame
in 1915 with a collection of short stories, Emma
McChesney and Co.. She wrote numerous plays
(Dinner at Eight and Stage Door, with George
S. Kaufman) as well as novels, including Giant
and Show Boat. She won the Pulitzer Prize in
1924 for So Big.

Ca: What was the Finaly case?

Few cases in recent memory aroused
more passion than that of Robert and
A
Gerald Finaly, two Jewish boys from France

.

claimed by both the Jewish and Catholic com-
munities.
Robert and Gerald were born
in 1941 and 1942, the sons of a
Viennese physician who es-
caped to Grenoble during the
war. Yet as the Nazis took con-
trol of France, Dr. and Mrs.
Finaly were deported to
Eastern Europe, where
they died in the death
camps.
Family friends,
meanwhile, placed the
two Finaly boys with a
Catholic institution,
which in turn handed
them over to An-
toinette Brun, the di-
rector of a children's
home in Grenoble. After
the war, she decided to
adopt Robert and Gerald.
Among Dr. Finaly's survivors
were three sisters who were eager to learn
the fate of their nephews. The women traced the
boys to Brun and asked that they be returned to
the family. Brun, who had had the boys convert-
ed to Catholicism, refused. In 1948, the Finaly

sisters took her to court.
The case lasted for five years, and virtually
everyone in France had an opinion on it. Some la-
beled the Jews ungrateful that the boys
had been saved at all. Others said they
objected to the sisters' case because
the women planned to take Robert
and Gerald, French citizens, to Is-
rael, where they would be raised
by the youngest Finaly sister,
Hedwig Rosner.
Author Francois Mauri-
ac also got involved, first
expressing outspoken sup-
port for keeping the boys in
a Catholic home in
France, then reversing
his opinion.
One of the strangest
incidents in the whole
affair occurred when
the boys seemingly disap-
peared. It was later dis-
covered they had been
smuggled out of France
and hidden with Basque
monks.
The case was finally settled in June 1953, when
France's highest court ruled in favor of the Finaly
sisters. Robert and Gerald were sent the next
month to live with their aunt Hedwig Rosner in
Gederah, Israel.

Send questions to "Tell Me Why" c to The Jewish News, 27676 Franklin Rd., Southfield, MI 48034

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