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March 11, 1994 - Image 74

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1994-03-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

HOWARD M. YERMAN, M.D.

is pleased to announce the relocation
of his office
in the practice of pediatric and adult

Ear, Nose and Throat
Head and Neck Surgery
to

Edgewood Professional Center
8898 Commerce Rd., Suite 1
Commerce Twp., Michigan 48382
(810) 360-5881

Saturday and Evening Hours Available

Staff privileges at Huron Valley, Sinai and
William Beaumont Hospitals

Ile Couldn't Care More"

OUR PERSONNEL IS

TRAINED, QUALIFIED & CERTIFIED

TO MEETAND CARE FOR A VARIElY
OF CLIENT HEALTH CARE NEEDS!

■ Companions/Homemakers ■ Physical Therapists
■ Certified Home Health Ades/Nursing Assistants
■ Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN)/ Registered Nurses (RN)
■ Services rendered at home, hospital, or assisted living facilities
■ Bonded & Screened ■ Private Insurance Accepted & Processed

WE ARE ... PROUD TO BE CLIENT DRIVEN!

WE ARE ... COMMITTED TO YOUR WELLNESS
WE ARE ... DEDICATED TO YOUR PERSONAL
SPECIAUZED HEALTH CARE REQUIREMENTS

CALL US FOR MORE INFORMATION AND A FREE NURSING ASSESSMENT

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HOURS:

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8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

American
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A Safe And Effective Approach To Relieving
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Office Hours:
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In Good Taste At
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at the best
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626-7707

T.'. MARBLE
RESTORATION

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call for an estimate

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SID & NAOMI SIEGEL
ARE MAKING VIDEO
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Find It All In
The Jewish News
Classifieds
Call 354-5959

HOT SHOTS page 73

Dr. Robert Michaels of
West Bloomfield has been
elected to the position of secre-
tary-treasurer of Sinai Hospi-
tal. Dr. Michaels is a graduate
of Northwestern University
Medical School in Chicago. He
completed his residency train-
ing in internal medicine and fel-
lowship training in nephrology
at Henry Ford Hospital in De-
troit.

Dr. Gary Edelson has been
elected a Fellow of the American
College of Physicians (ACP), the
professional association of in-
ternists. Dr. Edelson is medical
adviser of Osteoporosis Testing
Center in Southfield and assis-
tant professor in the department
of medicine at Wayne State Uni-
versity. His newest honorary ti-
tle recognizes achievement in
internal medicine. ❑

FIGHT page 70

with the coo/ people? Where are
those people now?"
Today, Mr. Goldberg focuses
on his newfound job as a sales
representative at Hovinga Busi-
ness Systems, an office equip-
ment company in Novi. His goal
is to excel in the workforce.
As for Mr. Goldberg's social
life, well, the bar scene has pret-
ty much given way to the Jew-
ish singles' circuit. Eventually,
Mr. Goldberg would like to set-
tle down and have children.
He still has occasional
episodes of loneliness and de-
pression, which he combats by
looking toward the future:
"I think to myself that there
will be a child or two in my life
who will hear what their father
went through to stay alive, and
they'll be happy. I've realized
that if I apply myself, I can over-
come anything. I never wanted
to die. rm obsessed with living."
finical social worker Joan
Israel says young adults
with serious illnesses
should consider modify-
ing their expectations of life.
"Young adulthood is usually
a time of vitality and hopeful-
ness. When there is a life-threat-
ening illness, however, special
issues arise in terms of the fu-
ture and making sure you find
feasible goals," Ms. Israel says.
These young adults must
cope with questions of living or
dying, paying medical bills and
sustaining experimental treat-
ments. While wondering if
they'll be alive to see the next
year, they witness their friends
getting married, having chil-
dren and buying homes.
Ms. Israel stresses the im-
portance of confronting the pos-
sibility that such dreams might
not come to fruition. "You might
not be able to get married and
have a family. But that might
be true even if you do not have
a life-threatening illness. Maybe
you have to change your goals."
Coping techniques Ms. Israel
suggests include individual and
group therapy, social activities
and keeping a journal.
For Lori Horwitz, keeping a
journal served a two-pronged
purpose: It helped her commu-
nicate when she was too weak
to tell friends how she was feel-
ing, and it provided a venue for
catharsis.

C

"Death to Oscar!" is scrawled
on many pages. Death to death,
in other words.
Says Ms. Horwitz: "I had
three head surgeries in a year
and a half. At first, I was real
strident. My body might be go-
ing against me, but not my
mind, not my emotions.
"But how can you be totally
OK after all the operations and
radiation? You can't, and it
takes a lot to admit it. Writing
the journal was really thera-
peutic."
Taking control of her medical
care also was therapeutic. At
first, Ms. Horwitz consulted a
doctor after experiencing fre-
quent and severe headaches.
Then she reported "grey blobs"
floating across her eyes and im-
pairing her vision.
The grey blobs turned out to
be an indication of photostasia,
symptomatic of brain tumors.
A week after her first doctor's
appointment, Ms. Horwitz was
under a neurosurgeon's knife in
an operating room at Henry
Ford Hospital.
Doctors located a tumor the
size of an olive in the pineal re-
gion of her brain. Because the
tumor was embedded in the
brain stem, where many of the
body's functions are regulated,
doctors could not extract the
whole tumor.
No one expected the tumor to
grow back, but it did. In De-
cember 1991, a medical test de-
tected an irregularity, which
doctors attributed to scar tis-
sue. They suggested Ms. Hor-
witz receive another test in six
months.
But she demanded a follow-
up after three months. Her in-
sistence might have saved her
life. Ms. Horwitz again found
herself in the operating room.
This time, the tumor was the
size of a golf ball.
After surgery, she started ra-
diation treatments at Harper
Hospital in Detroit.
"I was a ragged mess for a
very long time," she says. "Dur-
ing radiation, I cried every oth-
er second."
But she also got tough. Ms.
Horwitz scoured libraries to re-
search her illness. And she
wasn't afraid to express her
thoughts to medical profes-
sionals.

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