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February 18, 1994 - Image 105

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1994-02-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

\, BUSINESS

trampled on or asphyxiated."
The imprinting anchors are
shaped similarly to boat an-
chors with a tall triangle and
a round hole near the bottom,
with hooks protruding from
each point of the triangle. They
are suspended from the ceiling
and are spread equally through-
out the cage. Both the shape as
well as the blue color of the
anchors appeal to the chicks. '
The chicks spread evenly
throughout the pen also better
enables the chicks to reach the
feeders, thus decreasing mor-
tality rates. Weaker chicks who
might otherwise not reach their
food have a far greater chance
of survival. The imprinting an-
chors also reduce the chicks'
susceptibility to stress from
overcrowding.
The general mortality rates
for baby turkey chicks during
the first ten days of life is 3-10
percent. Studies show that the
introduction of imprinting an-
chors can lower the mortality
rate by an average of 40 per-
cent. These rates, Dr. Gvaryahu
explains, are linked to "behav-
ioral mortality," due mainly to
overcrowding.
In Israel, one-third of all
turkey farmers use Gallus
imprinting anchors. Gallus, the
only manufacturer of these
patent-protected turkey im-
printing anchors, is seek-
ing international marketing
partners.

Drip Irrigation
Development

SIMON GIVER

SPECIAL TO THE JEWISH NEWS

N

been developed by
Netafim, Israel's
largest manufacturer of such
equipment. Called the
Typhoon integral dripperline,
it is extremely resistant to
clogging, making it suitable
for use with waste water in
both agricultural and garden
settings, as well as industrial
applications such as flushing
lead in mines.
The Typhoon's rubber tubes
have a labyrinth "toothed"
water passage which
facilitates superior filtration.
This allows optimal flow,
prevents blocking and varia-
tions in water pressure which
cause inefficiency and
damage in other systems.
Netafim invested $6 million
in developing the Typhoon,
which is unique in its ability
to convey waste water and
other liquids which would
cause clogging.
The Typhoon is durable and
protected from damage by in-
sects, fertilizers and
chemicals. CI

Corner of Pontiac Trail & S. Commerce Rds,
WALLED LAKE

• 669-2010 •

*Lease based on approved credit. 12,000 milesyear maximum with no penalty. 10¢ per mile over 12,000 miles. Lessee responsible for excess wear and tear. Total of payments, take month-
ly payment, multiply by number of payments. f lus 4% use tax and plates. No option to purchase at termination. $250 disposition fee. Vehicles shown may have additional optional equip-
ment. Plus tax, title, plates, destination, includes rebate. Requires $2,000 down payment. First payment and security deposit in advance. Security deposit equals one monthly payment. Plus
$325 acquisition fee.

Market Fact

ewish News subscribers are heavy utilizers
of financial services.
Jewish News Own
48%
Common/Preferred Stock
48%
Mutual Funds
47%
Savings Certificates
21%
Municipal Bonds
19%
Investment Property
14%
Corporate Bonds

j

Source: 1993 Simmons-Jewish News Study

THE JEWISH NEWS

National Ave. Own
11.4%
7.6%
16.6%
2.4%
3.7%

0)

FE BRU AR Y

A

n innovative drip irri-
gation system has

B39

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