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January 28, 1994 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1994-01-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

•• II

COMPILED BY ELIZABETH APPLEBAUM

A( V\evunrcik

ome (JTA) — A
group of elderly
Jewish refugees
from Sarajevo, living in tem-
porary housing on the Croat-
ian coast, has started a
handmade yarmulke business
called the Menorah Club.
About 20 refugees knit
yarmulkes, which they sell for
10 Deutschmarks (about $6)
apiece, plus postage. The
refugees receive 5 Deutsch-
marks for each yarmulke, with
the rest of the money going for
materials and community ex-
penses.
Most of the yarmulkes are
blue with a metallic thread bor-
der, but other color combina-
tions are available on request.
'The Menorah Club is work-
ing nonstop," said club mem-
ber Lenka Montiljo Bilalagic.
"Our members are delighted
because we are busy, we are

useful, we can earn for our fu-
ture."
The project was started with
the encouragement of the
American Jewish Joint Distri-
bution Committee to help what
a JDC representative called
"enterprising and deserving
refugees from Sarajevo" help
themselves put their lives back
together.
"If these items catch on," a
JDC representative said, "we
may extend Menorah to the
Svarc (Jewish) Old Age Home
in Zagreb, which has so far
welcomed about 18 elderly
refugees among its 78 resi-
dents."
Individuals or organizations
wanting to place bulk orders
should contact Montiljo Bi-
lalagic, do the Jewish Com-
munity of Split, Zidovski prolaz
1, 58000 Split, Croatia, or call
385-58-45-672.

No Ell t e
Headlines

ickey Katz, the man
who made "April in
Portugal" into "Pesach
in Portugal" and sang "Davey
Crockett" in Yiddish, and who
spent his summers at Woodhull
Lake, is back.
Clarinetist Don Byron has
just released, "Don Byron plays
the Music of Mickey Katz" and,
with his band, is performing
Katz's klezmer tunes through-
out New York. His dreadlocks
swaying as he plays, Mr. Byron
"is a virtuoso, and only improves
on Katz's merely adequate clar-
inet work," according to the Jan.
16 New York Times Magazine.

M

A New Light On Strobe

trobe Talbott, the former Time magazine columnist re-
cently appointed to the number two position in the U.S.
State Department, is widely regarded as an expert on Rus-
sia. During his Time tenure, he also opined on Middle East pol-
itics.
In the Oct. 29, 1990,
Time, Mr. Talbott
ithrczd
wrote an essay called,
Strobe Talbott
"How Israel Is Like
1
How israei is Like Iraq
Iraq." Here, he char-
acterized Israel's poli-
cies in Judea and
Samaria as filled with
as much "irreden
tism" (claiming own-
ership of a land that
belongs to another)
as Iraq's in Kuwait,
and stated the
founding of Jewish
settlements was
l
equivalent to Sad-
dam Hussein's "sys-
tematic obliteration
Kuwaiti nation-
I hood."
Mr. Talbott pre-
dicted that Israel's
"irredentism"
would cost the
Jewish state its
status as "a light
unto the nations,"
its democracy
and "certainly its
support from the
rest of the
world."

Wit% /4 Fermat 4,56#tf
lac *eret
ieatte

S

7

he American Zionist
Movement (AZM) is
sponsoring the first
North American Zionist Song
Competition, open to musicians
of all ages and backgrounds.
Entries must be previously
unpublished and unrecorded
compositions that celebrate
Zionism and IsraeL They should
be two to four minutes long,
with either original lyrics or
adaptations of traditional
source material. Lyrics may be
in English and/or Hebrew. Only
one entry may be submitted per
person, in the form of an audio
cassette recording. Composi-
tions should be appropriate for
group singing.
"Music is a wonderful moti-
vating instrument for spread-
ing Jewish values to our entire

community," said former De-
troiter Rabbi Daniel Syme,
chairman of AZM's adult Zion-
ist education committee and se-
nior vice president of the Union
of American Hebrew Congre-
gations, which initiated the
competition. "It is a way to
teach Jews about Israel, its his-
tory, heroes and precepts."
Finalists will perform their
songs at the 1994 conference of
the Coalition for the Advance-
ment of Jewish Education,
which is sponsoring the event.
The deadline for entries is
April 25. Finalists will be in-
formed by July 1. For an entry
form, write Fred Greene, Amer-
ican Zionist Movement Nation-
al Office, 110 E. 59th St., New
York, NY 10022, or call (212)
318-6100.

itvolvcdNVmJar

o bear Saddam Hussein tell it..hc ansl the leaders of

„car,
nota,116., beg
a go q uirt
it Is ussadious Mast. b:thalasdaz,,
S
pansy.
s as cupation of thc
nuation
of Kuwait
in August. Jordan attacked Isrel and
Israels
W., Bank
an the
ricsof La bor-led governmen.held on to the territory for
q
tw from
taught and for bargaMing
born
forfeited the W.t
two defensible re.ors... a buffet against another
1not c rv n e.
r 1,
diti ona
a

\



leverage
its negotiations.
But once
the Likuti bloc came into dominance i.ndoltont
in the late Ilk,. ad ra,.„s.co
that hzd been lu iking on the fringes of Isiaelipoli,tan
th
cotcf, Y . T. Z
, dginnhis
theY
tiara—sne state's claim. reot ‘e
trot of the OttomanTiarks,
day esinde.
.-orx under
should be rejoined now.
man, Likud leaders believe that
1"."' Pa"°1the""'
ruled by Is-
est Bank was
sinceThe W
; raelites in biblical times, not one
square inch should be traded away as

rsG‘t'eat:;sl
Aria ib- t.ro
P r4rham
rael" is as ominous for the prospects
of them ever being real and lasting
the region as Saddam s
pc ace ill
ant nostalgia for Nebuchadneaar s
Ionian empire.
Babylonian

.tO .
ion daTilltr
a'rt
the desire
seobA.Ina
seizeladsgoves
or unredeemed Italy —
'la &mien!.
factor
in
World

epecessa cr•
NomrPdresh.- cr.zb.lcehi,
n.
r{.'
i:thc
was
soaai
W
when inedenttswtsd„,..,urte jiU
s.
;Vend

de

Tt ,j;j
t f,d1-1
in 1913.only tobe
n tience
°
f

as a result. India

of

,•.....a

h.n.p......1 border
Eve ..r
n when
. irre dentism do. not
-
tad to open conflict best . een rnon
ses.
c occupying powers are
with blood at t.el-Aza•felo
h
tries, it tends to cause misery
and
injustice
witiiin
them T that tncy commit new
won,
done
to their
ancestois
—all
the dkpoted territo ,
o intent on righting raid
ving in
Arrious warr ior became
people rum' b
's most noto
iel ;,haron het 3n app.. -nt
...roves:vino ttt.c.
dnle to the Middle East vo,uld a mttion
of }l
MC oral. lie iS bttSity CfCItt.ng
by
other
too entlausiasticslly: it seems—Mini sterou
sing.
war
the conduct of
zoning
ro aS
of I ess ish settlements. on the West Bank. nationhod.
Saddam I ..o is in
mandate to tre 3t
Kliv.iti
- i the r
..nese
far &alit
rnore erstisn
ruthless
but I steel's
the se... facts.n(<'m,
fsen hu-iness uit b his systis—,e
of than Sharon
act is. in origin
Because 1ST
method:
arc
Sadarn's
To and
, ,IfC,
hom3n
politicat diternina is more acute than Iraq's.
boldCS.
and essence. - Jewish stale. most Arab residents are never
going
to -1967
feel that
it is
pre
Israel'S
Gaza Strip. 1.7 mil-
nntthIcritsvcstflgenoughssithin
and
e .a t.,,,,, nisi
truly
..heir
Will feel former itp-
where
the populmion is g?`", lev..ish. But on the `Nest Bank

I

0,ettll1,1,71,,,, cnatOrsly 111, \
/oohed.

I
e f
linn Palestinians constitine an
en nr the
pressed. forever cheated, never CAfraCC
rixonc,ed.
s 1Crilf, Mount two t,Cc., tip— I,

F
15 VIM 11111,11.27 all COOCCI licit M fltvW ll1C

i tic one-sioedne* ct .he
Ce.• t.11,:cs CI 1...tkutl
a stare Ci ,ii.• ■
fun. :II:
11,
Bo; in I, long
dram —,,,seatz
••11,,11 OWL.
pifICT.11 ',Whilst.
1 .. f Wart a s
palcstunam are the ... n ....i . n.r.o...0.....tc.it
democracy. and ecru: ,
of brae r s
is
,,,,,,j;.,...,ip. z.:
viahilily and cfCtIshittly
Thar. even tIte
litiiI,'" fla , so ot
of the n told.
oon the le ,
ly •,,

Afaft,

.11,11,C

10,1,1,,Itt/0

i

Ala

A jazz musician whose bands
include the Don Byron Quin-
tent; Semaphore, a classical mu-
sic quintet; and Music for Six
Musicians, an Afro-Cuban en-
semble, Mr. Byron says he plays
klezmer music simply because
he likes it. He quickly tires of
everybody referring to him as
"that black guy that does
klezmer" and hates stories
about him headlined, "Bagels
and Dreadlocks."
"That stuff is offensive in so
many ways, some not even eth-
nic," he said. "It's just way too
cute."
A Boston resident, the 35-
year-old Mr. Byron also is a
baseball fan and is teaching
himself tennis. Atlantic Month-
ly jazz critic Francis Davis la-
beled him "easily the most
interesting and technically ac-
complished clarinetist to come
along in a very long time."

Religious Leaders
Meet In Jerusalem

eading rabbis are set to
meet early next month
with Christian leaders
from throughout the world for
a four-day conference on "Reli-
gious Leadership in Secular So-
ciety" in Jerusalem.
Among the participants will
be Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger,
president of the Vatican Secre-
tariat for Doctrine and Faith;
George Carey, head of the An-
glican Church; the Very Rev.
Lois Wilson, former president

L

of the World Council of Church-
es; Chief Rabbi Rene Samuel
Sirat, president of the Council
of European Rabbis; Michel
Sabbah, Latin patriarch of
Jerusalem; and Rabbi Shlomo
Goren, emeritus chief rabbi of
Israel.
The program will feature
workshops and speakers
addressing institutionalized re-
ligion and science. Topics
include fertility, abortion and
death.

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