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January 14, 1994 - Image 70

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1994-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

tita 'tit &watt day eaten."...

Summer at
Cranbrook

Is

(Ages 5 12) June 20 July 29
Instruction in tennis, canoeing,
swimming, archery, weaving, ceramics,
dance, arts & crafts, nature study, sports

-

June 20 July 29
Drama instruction by professionals
with weekly performances in the
Greek amphitheatre

-

645-3678

For more info. call Mrs. Bergstein 626-3194/932-8584

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DNINECTION

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FOR THE SUMMER OF A LIFETIME

TEENS 13-17 YEARS

ACTIVE
TEEN TOURS

CYCLING "PLUS"
PROGRAMS:

OUTDOOR
ADVENTURE:

• Combination Camping / Hotel / Dorm Tours.
• Western U.S.A., Canada and Europe.

• For 1st time beginners to intermediate.
• "Plus" ... much more than just cycling!
• Cape Cod, Vermont, Pacific Coast and Europe.

• Ski, Raft, Rock Climb, Mountain Bike, Tennis .
• No experience required!
• Canadian Rockies, Whistler and Vancouver.

∎■■•

COLLEGE STUDENTS 17 - 22 YEARS

CAMP SEA-GULL

Charlevoix, Michigan

•Cycling and Touring Europe or the Pacific Coast


CI)

CALL NOW FOR

We're CAMP SEA-GULL—located on beautiful Lake
Charlevoix in the northwest corner of Michigan's lower
peninsula. Now in our 40th year, we offer quality
summer camping for boys and girls, ages 8 to 16.

THE D ET RO I T JEWIS H NEWS



Our program includes land sports, dramatics, fine arts,
an extensive waterfront and comprehensive wilderness
tripping. For those finishing the 7th grade, we also
offer a two-week Colorado hiking experience.

Our 1994 session dates and tuitions are as follows:
Session 1: 3 weeks 6/26-7/15 $1200.00
Mid Session: 2 weeks or Colorado Trek: 7/17-7/29 $800.00
Session 2: 3 weeks 7/31-8/19 $1400.00

A FREE BROCHURE

MARK SEGAL, Director

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• Glacier Skiin. • Colorado White Water Rafting)

ItliLLOWAY

Day Camp. Inc

BeeStimmerEver/



Jack and Bill Schulman, Directors

5680 Euclid • West Bloomfield, MI • 48323 • 313-855-5873

CAMP
fa®

ACCREDITED

Since 1954

POND AND LAKE • ARTS AND CRAFTS • DANCE
ATHLETICS • GYMNASTICS • PHOTOGRAPHY
NATURE PROGRAM • ANIMAL FARM • GO-KART
TENNIS • SWIMMING • FISHING • BOATING
SAILING • WATER SKIING • TUBING • COMPUTERS

ilderness tripping • sailing • line arts crafts • canoeing

CALL LORRAINE & ARNIE (313) 932-2123

American
Camping
Association

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waterskiing • land sports • windsurfing • dramatics • tennis

• Grand Canyon in Arizona • San Francisco's Alcatraz

-g.

Cranbrook Summer
Programs Office

REASONABLE RATES - DISCOUNTS



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For further information, call

AUGUST 2 - 26, 1994
GIBORIM
BOYS DIVISION
Ages 6 - 12
Monday - Friday
10 a.m. - 4 p.m.
4230 Middlebelt
West Bloomfield

JUNIOR KAMP Ages 6 & 7
GIRLS DIVISION - Ages 8. 12
Monday - Friday 10-4
4230 Middlebelt
West Bloomfield

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Guidei

AWAY page 69

JUNE 27 - JULY 29, 1994
KINDY KAMP - Ages 3 -5
Mon.-Fri. 10 - 2 or 10 - 4
32000 Middlebelt
Farmington Hills

CRANBROOK
SUMMER THEATRE

OTHER CRANBROOK
PROGRAMS
• Elderhostel
• Focal Point — A film-making institute
for adults.
• Art and French classes for adults.
• Soccer camps for boys and girls, ages
10 and up

w

The Kinder Kamp with Jewish Pizzazz
A SUMMERTIME OF PLEASURE
A LIFETIME OF MEMORIES ...

CRANBROOK, KINGSWOOD
& BROOKSIDE DAY CAMPS:

-

Ct

B.H.

"the child barely has time to get
into the camp routine before he
has to go home." Camps offer
short sessions for a couple of
reasons — they may be all par-
ents can afford and/or a short-
camp session fits in better with
family plans. If neither of these
applies, Mrs. Young encourages
parents to opt for a longer pro-
gram.
But other directors contend
that short sessions give first-
timers a good taste of camp. For
example, Camps Airy and
Louise recommend that all first-
time campers, regardless of age,
attend a 2-week session. Why?
"It's a whole different commu-
nity" than at home, explained
Ed Cohen. "The child has to
deal with 12 or 13 other young-
sters in a cabin rather than be-
ing the apple of their parents'
eye. It's much easier to face 2
weeks than 4."
All the experts say that par-
ents can do a lot to make the
first-time overnight experience
a success. Starting, says Mrs.
Hettleman, with how they "pre-
sent" it to the child, which is of-
ten determined by the parents
own motivation in sending the
child to camp in the first place.
For example, parents often
have fond memories of their
own childhood camping experi-
ences. They want their child to
have the same happy experi-
ence, and they convey these pos-
itive feelings. For another
example, Mrs. Hettleman con-
tinues, if the parents think the
child might have a "separation
problem," they can prepare him
with overnight visits with
friends and relatives.
Then there are parents who
practically doom a first-time
camping experience with their
negative colorations. Ed Cohen
said, "You get a lot of parents
who say, 'Oh God, I know we're
going to miss you. We're going
to cry. Don't worry, your grand-
father isn't going to die while
you're away.' It's one thing to
express your emotions to your
child, it's another to load him
with your emotional baggage."
Dr. Gershman agrees. "I find
that parents need more prepa-
ration for this first-time
overnight camp experience —
and this includes parents who
themselves spent summer af-
ter summer at camp — than
their kid. The kid is ready for
camp but the parents say, one
more summer at home. It's the
parents who aren't ready to let
go, not the kids."
When Maryland Rabbi Dou-
glas Kohn and his wife, Reva,
talked to their son Benjamin
about attending Camp Harlem,
they took a positive approach.
"We didn't say, do you want to
go to overnight camp? We
showed Ben a video of camp, we
stressed how exciting it could
be. He'd had a good day camp

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