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December 17, 1993 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-12-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"If You Don'i

sr

Subscribe...
You Don't Know."

Demjanjuk's City
Receives Education

JENNIFER FINER JEWISH NEWS INTERN

Betty Rotberg Ellias met with Elie Wiesel about the curriculum.

A

locally produced Holo-
caust curriculum used in
classrooms around the
world will soon be taught
at the Ohio high school John
Demjanjuk's son attended.
Beginning in May, students
taking an advanced world his-
tory course at Normandy High
School in Parma, Ohio (near
Cleveland), will study Life Un-
worthy of Life.
Materials were donated to
the school by the Holocaust Ed-
ucation Coalition, a coalition of
various metro Detroit organi-
zations that was established by
the Hidden Children, a group
whose members were hidden
during the Holocaust.
Life Unworthy of Life co-au-
thor Betty Rotberg Ellias said
literature about the curriculum
was specifically sent to the high
school where a history teacher
decided she would incorporate
the material into a unit on
World War II.
"We wanted to provide the
history teachers at Normandy
High School with the Holocaust
curriculum to teach their stu-
dents about the Holocaust, es-
pecially since John Demjanjuk
lives in the area," Ms. Ellias said.

1



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Normandy Principal James
Kubinski added, "'Me fact that
John Jr. was once a student
here is not really a factor in our
decision to teach this informa-
tion. Some of the teachers re-
member him, but the kids don't
see the connection."
John Demjanjuk Jr. gradu-
ated in 1983. His father, a re-
tired Cleveland auto worker,
was accused of being a sadistic
Treblinka death camp guard.
Earlier this year, the Israeli
Supreme Court overturned a
lower court ruling that convict-
ed John Demjanjuk of being
"Ivan the Terrible." Mr. Dem-
janjuk admitted, however, that
he was a guard at other death
camps.
First published in 1987, Life
Unworthy of Life was approved
by the Department of Educa-
tion as an exemplary curricu-
lum and accepted into its
national diffusion network, a
part of the Department of Ed-
ucation that approves grant
money for curricula throughout
the United States.
Dr. Sidney Bolkosky and Dr.
David Harris also authored the
curriculum. ❑

Learning Lessons
Of The Holocaust

JENNIFER FINER JEWISH NEWS INTERN

Name

E

Address

City State

18

ddie Pruett, a senior at
Pershing High School in
Detroit, thought the visit
he made last week to the
Holocaust Memorial Center
would be "just another boring
field trip."
By lunch, he had changed his
mind.
"I had heard about the Holo-

Zip

Phone

12/17/93

caust, but I didn't realize how
bad it was," he said. "I knew
there were camps, but when I
saw pictures of such skinny
men it was horrible. The Nazis
didn't care about human life.
This field trip was a good ex-
perience."
Mr. Pruett was among 150
students from the tri-country

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