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December 17, 1993 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-12-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DETROIT

750

THE

3

SH NEWS

TEVET 5754/DECEMBER

1 7 , 1 9 9 3

Eban: There Is No Alternative

To a crowd of 1,500, the Israeli diplomat speaks about peace.

RUTH LITTMANN STAFF WRITER

__ ____:, sraeli ambassador, foreign min-
ister, author and diplomat Abba
Eban is famous for saying: "Men
and nations behave wisely once
they have exhausted all other al-
ternatives."
This week, he said, Israel and
Arab nations in the Middle East
have one remaining alternative: peace.
"I don't say the success of (September's)
peace accord with the PLO will bring
about paradise. I do say its failure will
bring about an inferno," he said.
Mr. Eban spoke Sunday to a crowd of
nearly 1,500 at Adat Shalom Synagogue.
The Jewish Federation of Metropolitan
Detroit sponsored the event to kick off
it annual Allied Jewish Campaign.
As Israel's Prime Minister Yitzhak
Rabin and Palestinian Liberation
Organization leader Yassir Arafat were
meeting in Cairo on Sunday to discuss
phase two of the peace process, Mr. Eban
told local Jews to support their efforts but
refrain from interfering.
Practice faith and be optimistic, he said.
Israel's leaders will steer the country to-
ward a lasting resolution.
Mr. Eban addressed worries about ac-
celerating violence between Arab and
Israeli extremists. Such incidents provide
only further reason for negotiations, he
said. Recent killings of Jews and Arabs
should catalyze, not quell, peace talks, he
said.
"The Israeli government is not going to
break negotiations — no matter what hap-
pens," he said.

Revolulims
In Reform

RUTH LITTMANN STAFF WRITER

Reform Judaism's
changing. Some say
it's becoming too
ritualistic.
The "revolution" takes
the form of kippot and
tallit, but rabbis say it
leaves the basics intact.

Story on page 52

Photos by Glenn Tlrest

i

Abba Eban speaks with Adat Shalom Rabbi Efry Spectre.

There is a blatant precedent for the
government's unyielding efforts, Mr. Eban
said. He referred to 1974, when three
Lebanese terrorists held hostage a class
of schoolchildren in the northern Israeli
village of Ma'alot. The incident occurred
during disengagement negotiations with
Syria following the Yom Kippur War.
Israel's government deployed forces to
recapture the school. The three terrorists
were killed, but only after they shot 19
schoolchildren.
Instead of ending negotiations, Israel

BUSINESS

LISLEY PEARL STAFF WR TER

each congregation feeds and shelters in-
dividuals and drives them to jobs, inter-
views or social service agencies — any
place that might assist in getting them
back on their feet.
This summer, Congregation Beth
Shalom also participated in the program.
Temple Israel already has secured 250
volunteers to greet residents, prepare,
serve and clean up after meals, supervise
activities and individuals and do the laun-
dry, provided by SOS, for the week of Dec.
19-26.
The Royal Oak YMCA offers shower
and clean-up facilities.
"This is a very inexpensive thing to do,"
said Nancy Gad-Harf, Temple Israel pro-

HOMELESS page 26

EBAN page 26

Inside

Temple Israel Will House
The Holiday Homeless

emple Israel congregants don't
need to look for open restau-
rants or videotapes on Dec. 25
to entertain themselves.
Instead, many will give
their time to try and ensure a
happy Christmas holiday
among the homeless.
For the second time, Temple Israel will
become a temporary home to about 30
residents of the South Oakland Shelter.
Temple Israel first joined with SOS in
July 1992.
Based in Royal Oak, the South
Oakland Shelter rotates weekly among
churches, and more recently temples and
synagogues, as interim housing for indi-
viduals for up to 30 days. For seven days,

decided to continue. This decision, he said,
was a pivotal one, which led to the con-
clusion of the Yom Kippur War.
Throughout his speech and during a
press conference earlier Sunday after-
noon, Mr. Eban repeated: "Terrorism is
the disease. Negotiation is the remedy.
Never subordinate the remedy to the dis-
ease."
Criticizing the media for incorrect cov-
erage of the peace process, he said there
is a rampant misperception that Israel

Sky High

Charter flights overcome
the bad rap.

Page 28

CAMPUS LIFE

Looking At Issues

College students...present
their views.

Page 86

Donna Stewart and her children stayed at Temple
Israel in 1992.

Contents on page 3

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