100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

December 10, 1993 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-12-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

O

ree om To Learn

The celebration of Chanukah is a new experience
for immigrants at a special Chanukah party.

JENNIFER FINER JEWISH NEWS INTERN

Una Rudashevsky
shows off her
artwork

C )

w

CI)

w
E-
C)

-

LL,
C:1

w

F-

14

ine-year-old Elina Reznik never had
a menorah.
On Sunday, she made one.
Eleven-year-old Yana Vortsman
knew there was a Jewish holiday
called Chanukah. But she had no
idea why it was celebrated.
On Sunday, she learned.
Elina and Yana, along with other
New American children and their
families, attended the Jimmy Pren-
tis Morris Jewish Community Cen-
ter for a Chanukah party sponsored
by Jewish Experiences For Families
(JEFF) and the Young Adult Divi-
sion of the Jewish Federation of Met-
ropolitan Detroit (YAD).
"The idea was to teach these chil-
dren about Chanukah and give them
the tools to bring Chanukah into
their homes," said Ellie Slovis, JEFF
coordinator of New American pro-
gramming.

Many Jewish children from the
former Soviet Union, including Irma
Volvovskaya, came to America know-
ing little about their Jewish heritage.
What they do know is that practic-
ing Judaism in their former home-

"The idea was to
teach these children
about Chanukah."

Ellie Slovis

land could be very difficult.
"The other (Russian) people
don't like Jews," Inna said. "If they
saw us (practicing Judaism), they
might have done something bad
to us."

Since coming to America, Irma has
learned about Chanukah in Hebrew
school.
Even before Sunday, 4-year-old
Pavel Okun said he learned about
the eight-day holiday in school, Yeshi-
va Beth Yehudah. Pavel said he
knows he is supposed to put candles
in the menorah and that Chanukah
is a Jewish holiday celebrated by a
lot of children.
During the party, children had
the opportunity to make wooden drei-
dels, menorot and Chanukah deco-
rations. They also were given
Chanukah guides in Russian, can-
dles and a Russian/English pop-up
storybook put together by YAD vol-
unteers.
Maureen Schiffman brought pup-
petry, storytelling and music to tell
the Chanukah story, which was
translated into Russian. ❑

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan