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November 26, 1993 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-11-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



SINAI HOSPITAL

tis riti q
6
"

RESCUE page 5

Women's Health Series

Join us for an informative discussion
presented by specialists in the field of women's health care.
Lectures are held 7 - 9 p.m., the first and third Wednesday of
each month at one of the following locations:

First Wednesday

Third Wednesday

Sinai Hospital
Zuckerman Auditorium
6767 W. Outer Drive
(between Greenfield & Hubbell)
Detroit

Bloomfield Township Library
L.H. Green Room
1099 Lone Pine Road
(southeast corner of Lone Pine
and Telegraph)

Schedule of Topics

December 1

Sinai Hospital

Ovarian Cancer

December 15

Bloomfield Township Library

Contraception in
the '90s

These free lectures are open to the public.
To reserve a seat, please call
1-800-248-3627

Another special Sinai program created just for women is Vital Woman.
Sinai provides a speaker to come to your home and address up to 14
of your friends and neighbors. Call us for more information!

Some of them displayed any-
thing but gentleness while oth-
ers exhibited rachmones (pity)
and extraordinary solicitude.
Because of them, we have with
us people like Erna Gorman,
Alex Ehrmann, Stefa Kupfer,
Rene Lichtman, Maria Orlovs-
ka, Jack Gunn and Fred Less-
ing: child victims of the
Holocaust who survived in hid-
ing and who, despite the haunt-
ing experiences, have created
families, full lives and have be-
gun to emerge from hiding.
I think it is very important to
emphasize the complexities of
the context of these stories and
how much these actions mean
in that regard. It strikes me as
imperative to recognize the un-
certain varieties of motivations
that drove the rescuers. That
awareness may serve to under-
score the totality of the Holo-
caust, its all-emcompassing
nature, the ease with which it
subsumed everyone in Europe
except a select few.
Any consideration of the res-
cuers is only half complete with-
out a rudimentary knowledge
of what the Holocaust was. It
was less a function of religious

anti-Semitism than of other sec-
ular, thoughtless procedures.

The quest for responsibility
eludes us in a miasma of com-
plicity that went from school
children to university profes-
sors, civil servants to technical
advisers, scientists to soldiers.
At a time when rescue again
has become a public issue —
rescue in Bosnia, for example
— we might reexamine the com-
plicated questions that sur-
round the subject during the
Holocaust. What was then un-
thinkable has become com-
monplace, routinely watched by
each of us as we eat dinner. Yet
who knows what to do about dy-
ing children, murdered moth-
ers, raped daughters, tortured
people?
Rescue, in all it facets, may
demonstrate to us that the Holo-
caust indeed has taught us few
if any lessons. Against this
enormous institutional tide
stand the individuals; and there,
perhaps, we can take some com-
fort. If there is a lesson to be
learned from them, however, as
some of them argue, I will defer
to those who can show and
teach it clearly. ❑

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AIVIERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY'

Jews In Former USSR
Fewer Than Expected

Jerusalem (JTA) — There
are fewer Jews living in the
former Soviet Union than
had previously been believ-
ed, a survey issued by the
Jewish Agency for Israel in-
dicates.
According to the survey,
which was compiled by the
Jewish Agency's unit for the
former Soviet Union and
Central Europe, there are
1.4 million Jews living in
200 communities in the re-
publics comprising the
former Soviet Union.
The figure is sharply lower
than previous estimates,
which put the total Jewish
population there at between
3 million and 5 million.
"The survey is not scien-
tific, it is not a census," said
Baruch Gur, head of the unit
that compiled the survey.
But he said the new figure,
compiled by agency repre-
sentatives working in the
field in cooperation with
local authorities, is a
reliable one that reflects
"self-identified Jews."
The survey, which breaks
down populations by com-
munities, "gives an impor-

taut demographic picture" of
the size and locations of Jew-
ish communities within the
former Soviet Union, he
said.
According to the survey's
findings, the number of
emigrants from the Central
Asian republics and the
Caucasus could rise because
of ethnic conflicts that arose
following the collapse of the
Soviet Union on Dec. 25,
1991.
The survey indicated that
there are some 80,000 Jews
living in such tension-ridden
areas.
Of that total, 17,000 Jews
live in the republic of
Georgia, 32,000 in Azerbai-
jan and 30,000 in the nor-
thern Caucasus.
About 650,000 Jews live in
Russia and 150,000 in the
southern Islamic republics,
according to the survey.
Mr. Gur said he believes
that if present patterns of
instability continue within
the republics of the former
Soviet Union, 120,000 Jews
will emigrate annually dur-
ing the next five years and
that 70,000 of them will
make aliyah to Israel.



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