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October 29, 1993 - Image 71

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I"WIS

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A longtime proponent of
coexistence between Arabs
and Jews, Mr. Kollek
nonetheless foresees many
bumps on the road to peace.
Mr. Kollek takes a
pragmatic view when asked
whether he sees Jerusalem
as a model of coexistence.
"I think Jerusalem is a
comparative success," he
said. "The amount of
violence here is com-
paratively insignificant to
what it might be or what
people prophesied for it.
"But we are far from a
success. We still have people
who see a wall of fear bet-
ween here and Arab parts of
town, who are afraid when
they see Arabs walking in
the street."
The mayor is clearly wor-
ried about statements by Mr.
Arafat and others claiming
that east Jerusalem will be
the capital of a future Pales-
tinian state.
Immediately after the
Israeli-PLO accord was

He is a longtime
proponent of
coexistence
between Arabs and
Jews.

signed in Washington, Mr.
Kollek called an emergency
meeting of the City Council
to reaffirm the city's status
as "the capital of Israel,
united under Israeli
sovereignty and ad-
ministered by one
municipality."
Mr. Kollek believes that
"the Palestinians have
every right to expect that
their religious and cultural
heritage will be fully
observed, and we have done
a great deal to do this."

He noted that "in the
agreement just signed, it
says that the question of
Jerusalem will not be
discussed for a three years.
The Arabs won't give up
their demands for Jerusalem
easily. And we cannot give
in and compromise on
Jerusalem. They accepted
Israel only because they
came to the conclusion they
can't defeat us."
Looking ahead, he says,
"During the next three
years we must strengthen
the city to such an extent
that they will come to the
conclusion that Jerusalem
cannot be their capital.
"This can only be done if
we have a very strong im-
migration to Jerusalem, if
we build strong industry
that gives work to the immi-
grants, if we build housing."
With typical frankness,
Mr. Kollek called on
Diaspora Jews to lend a
hand in the fight for a
unified Jerusalem.
"Diaspora Jewry has a
tremendous job to do. I've
tried for years to say this to
Jewish leaders, without any
success. They didn't see fur-
ther than the difficulties at
the tip of their nose.
"I hope that the present
situation will make it clear
that assistance to Jerusalem
must go beyond quoting
slogans and Bible verses.
What we need is more devel-
op me nt , more tourism
directed toward the city."
Reflecting on the accord
between Israel and the PLO,
Kollek says, "It's not an
easy situation, but it's a
price we're paying for the
hope that those children who
just started school this year
will not have to go to war,
and that their parents will
be able to look at these chil-
dren and not always think
what their fate may be." LI

An Israeli Film
Wins In Switzerland

Geneva (JTA) — An Israeli
film made in Yiddish has
won the Silver Medal at a
documentary film festival
held last week in Nyon,
Switzerland.
The Israeli entry, Choice
and Destiny, made by Tsipi
Reibenbach of Tel Aviv,
focuses on the lives of a cou-
ple who are Polish-born
Holocaust survivors.
The film, in which Yiddish
is the only language spoken,
follows the daily lives of the
filmmaker's parents, Yitz-
chak and Fruma, 80 and 72
years old. The focus is on

their attitudes toward life
and each other.
The film, which deals with
the process of aging in gen-
eral, also mourns the ge-
neration lost in the Holo-
caust.
The filming process enabl-
ed the couple to open up
about their experiences in a
way they had not previously.
"My father was willing to
cooperate" in making the
film, said Ms. Reibenbach.
He told her, "How much
longer do I have to live? I
want to leave you something
to remember me by." ❑

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