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October 29, 1993 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"Incredible"

U R



ITU

Al

Bitter Harvest
For Gush Katif

MICHELLE MAZEL SPECIAL TO THE JEWISH NEWS

G

"Incredible"

PR ICE

AGS

Tremendous Selection

♦ "FORM ITALIA"
Leather

All New Merchandise

♦ Sectionals

50%
OFF

♦ Wall Units

♦ Tables

♦ Sofas

♦ Love Seats

♦ Dining
Rooms

♦ Bedrooms

4- 4 ' C.., 0

AlE1 300VH

.au )100H9 MOOV3 VV

SHERWOOD
WAREHOUSE

, C4s‘I',

Farmington Hills
Industrial Center
(5, ,,,
It< ,
0,1,

be/ 0

HALSTEAD RD.

and more!

SHERWOOD STUDIOS
WAREHOUSE
24760 Crestview Ct.
Farmington Hills

476-3760

10 MILE

Peter
Cristiano
Southfield City Council

I EXPERIENCE

I

• Southfield Government

32 Yrs.

• Southfield Council

12 Yrs.

• Southfield Council President

2 Yrs.

• Southfield Administrator

12 Yrs.

• Southfield Family Resident

35 Yrs.

I commiTmENT

• New Senior Housing Developments.

• Paramedics Life Support Units.

22

von
ammo

MOM 2

• Community Police and Fire Safety.

• Cultural Arts and Recreation.

• Strengthened Neighborhoods.

(Raid for by Citizens for Cristiana)

&

focs 6 00

(IV

1,e

gift

We are
pleased to

announce
that Martin Malter, formerly of Matter
Furs, is associated with us. Mr. Malter is

looking forward to serving his customers
and friends at Ceresnie & Offen.

181 S. Woodward Ave.
Birmingham, MI 48009 • 642-1690

ush Katif' roughly
translated into Eng-
lish is "Harvest Coun-
try." But the early set-
tlers in this region certainly
could not have envisaged the
bitter harvest they would one
day reap. Catapulted into the
international spotlight in re-
cent months, five Gush Katif
residents have been murdered
by Arabs in the last year
alone.
What brings Jews to this
12 x 1 1/2 mile (31 x 4 kilo-
meters) stretch of fertile soil
at the southern tip of the
Gaza strip, between the
powder kegs of Gaza and
Rafiah? Surely this can't be
the most appealing place to
make one's home and raise
one's family.
Some of Gush Katif's 4,200
settlers, about 50 percent of
whom are religious, came
from Yamit in northern Sinai,
which was to be Israel's third
major port. Returned to Egypt
in 1982 following the Camp
David accords, residents were
forcibly removed by the
Israeli army, and Yamit, a
town of lush gardens and
opulent homes, was dismantl-
ed piece by piece.
The settlement drive in
Gush Katif, which was
originally intended as a link
with Yamit, was backed by
both left and right wing
governments and was
scheduled to make up for the
loss of Yamit — sometimes
referred to as the "new
Yamit."
For the religious settlers,
there was also the biblical
connection to Gaza and its
celebrated strip — from
whence came the biblical
stories Samson and the
faithless Delilah, and David
and Goliath.
The Philistines, who in-
habited the region, are long
gone and the last Jews were
forced out of the city by Arabs
in 1931 (during the British
Mandate), with the British
Governor general indiffer-
ently looking on. Renewed
Jewish settlement in the area
began in the aftermath of the
Six-Day War, with military
settlements like Gan Or
(Garden of Light), Bedolah
(Crystal) and Gedid (Date
Harvest) which were later
turned over to civilians.
Hard work, inspiration,
know-how, and generous set-
tlement budgets turned Gush
Katif into a model province

with new roads, an air strip,
pleasant houses, and well
tended gardens. Its hot
houses produce prize-winning
tomatoes for export, accoun-
ting for 40 percent of the
country's tomato exports; its
roses are flown to European
markets in mid winter, and
the house plants of one
moshav alone (Moshav Bnei
Atzmon), bring in $1 million
a year.
A successful tourist resort
offering horse and camel
rides, the 114 rooms of the
Palm Beach Hotel are fully
booked weeks in advance. The
attraction? Endless golden
beaches, a sea breeze, and
startling sunsets which usher
in enchanted evenings.

Hard work and
know how turned
Gush Katif into a
model province.

The only thing missing is
more settlers. The original
government plan called for
5,000 families at the outset
and 25,000 by 1989. Only 16
settlements, however, some
with only 15 families,
materialized.
What went wrong?
Firstly, Arabs begin in-
filtrating settlements at
night to steal, set fire to pack-
ing houses, and destroy
greenhouses, leading to
retaliatory raids by the set-
tlers. Then with the onset of
the intifada in 1987, the con-
frontations escalated, and set-
tlers began traveling armed
and mostly in pairs.
Because of its relatively
small population, Gush Katif
farmers have had to rely
heavily on cheap Arab labor.

Women's Group
Plans Tea

The Birmingham Jewish
Women's Group will hold its
fourth tea 8:30 p.m. Nov. 3 at
the home of Mrs. Cindy Levine,
753 Smith, Birmingham.
Mrs. Rochel Polter will speak
on matters regarding the mod-
ern Jewish woman. Mrs. Elaine
Blustain will exhibit classic arts
of the '90s.
For information, call Mrs.
Polter, 544 8639.



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