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October 23, 1993 - Image 34

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Viewing this home is an experience; guests become aware of
themselves and the enviornment There are views of the water from
almost all points in the home. You can stand in the bedroom, look out
through the angles of nature and look back into the living room.

Opening the door, visitors are amazed at the space of this white, mod-
ern home with two wings that intersect at a V-shape angle and slope
down to a lake. It is an awesome, breathtaking sight — and site.
Dirk Denison, the architect, explains that the home is a simple form
with the intersection of two parts. The V-shape fold came about be-
cause of the narrow, steeply pitched site. There is a 22-foot drop to the
lake. "The angles have come about for a reason in the develop-
ment of the house and they have a result both of which are impor-
tant. The reason is the folding of the line. The only way to fit the site
was to fold it," he said.
The house appears to be a part of nature. The planting looks ran-
dom, but it was carefully chosen. "We planted the front to make it seem

like it was in its primeval state. The front of the house deals with width
as opposed to height. It's expressing the spreading landscape," ex-
plained Denison.
Viewing this home is an experience; guests become aware of them-
selves and the environment. There are views of the water from almost
all points in the home. You can stand in the bedroom, look out through
the angles of glass into nature and look back into the living room. 'There
are very few buildings where you have that opportunity," he noted.
Denison collaborated with architect Adrian Luchini, of St. Louis, on
the initial concept but it was Denison who worked closely with the
clients to complete the home, which includes the furnishings. Although
Denison resides in Chicago, runs his own architecture firm and is an

The view from the kitchen encompass-
es the dining mom, living roan and vista
of the lake.

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