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October 15, 1993 - Image 29

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Follow Up

A fresh look at some recent stories in the headlines.

Jewish
Archives
Now On
Microfilm

RUTH UTTMANN

STAFF WRITER

I

he Jewish Community
Archives — which re-
flect about 100 years of
Jewish history in De-
troit — are now available for

Sharon Atterman

`Michigan
Daily'
Runs
Letter

RUTH UTTMANN

STAFF WRITER

wo years after the Uni-
versity of Michigan's
student-run newspaper
ran a paid advertise-
ment claiming the Holocaust
never happened, a letter to
the editor, which advocates
the same revisionist theory,
appeared in the Oct. 6 edition
of the Michigan Daily.
Anticipating a student out-
cry similar to the one that oc-
curred two years ago, Editor
In Chief Josh Dubow and An-
drew Levy, editorial page
editor, ran "An explanation
to our readers" in the same
issue:

new Holocaust Memorial Mu-
seum in Washington, D.C.,
which, he contends, "displays
no proof anywhere of homici-
dal 'gassing chambers,' and
no proof that even one indi-
vidual was 'gassed' at any
camp liberated by the allied
armies..."
In addition to the editors'
note, the Michigan Daily ran
two opposing viewpoints next
to Mr. Smith's submission.
The editorial from Daily staff
denounced revisionism as ir-
rational and illogical:
"No matter the motivation
of these theorists — be it

anti-Semitic or some perverse
political agenda — Holocaust
revisionism should be con-
demned."
Daily Arts Editor Jessie
Halladay, in another editori-
al, recounted her experience
in Washington's Holocaust
Museum:
"When I was done touring
the exhibits, I wondered how
this could not affect people. I
wondered why there are
people who doubt this ever
happened ... If this isn't some-
thing we should remember
every day, I don't know what
is."

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

he new Southfield office
of Jewish National
Fund is a mile from the
old one, twice as large
and a lot less expensive.
The JNF Charach Building
at 17100 W. Ten Mile Rd. will
be dedicated 2:30 p.m. Sun-
day in ceremonies honoring
the donors, Manny and Na-
talie Charach.
The JNF's new quarters

have more than 4,000 square
feet, including -a 2,000-
square-foot meeting room
that is as large as JNF's old,
rented offices a mile west. Ed-
ward Rosenthal, JNF execu-
tive director, said the new
facility is already saving the
organization money in
rentals for meetings of its lo-
cal board, Women of JNF and
young leadership groups. Be-

cause of its kitchen facility,
the group is considering
starting a JNF lunch-and-
learn program.
Mr. Rosenthal expects the
savings to total at least
$20,000 per year — the
equivalent of 2,000 trees
planted in Israel — "plus the
convenience of having our
own home."

ast Sunday, children took
to the streets — actually
the Maple-Drake Jewish
Community Campus, to raise
money for Yad Ezra, the
state's only kosher food bank.
Almost 200 children gath-
ered pledges for the food bank
and then brought their fam-
ily and friends to Yad Ezra's
second annual walk.
The walk, which spanned
just over a mile, took place
entirely on JCC grounds ac-
cording to Dr. Jeffery Adler,
walk chairperson and Yad

Ezra treasurer.
Organizers will know this
week how much money was
raised, but are concerned last
year's $15,000 mark may not
be reached.
"I think the walk is still in
its infancy and it is still be-
ing learned about by the com-
munity. As more people find
out about it, it will become an
increasingly bigger and big-
ger success," Dr. Adler said.
Yad Ezra did surpass last
year's totals in its holiday
food drive, collecting over

24,000 pounds of food last
month.
Walk participants got a
chance to design pieces of fab-
ric which, when put together,
will make up a border to hang
in Yad Ezra's waiting room.
Children also painted
shopping bags and pushkes
so they can collect food and
money for Yad Ezra through-
out the year.
Yad Ezra provides food to
more than 1,500 persons a
month.

New JNF
Office
ma
ma C
CutsC
IEW5H
C osts
1111111)
Yad Ezra
L
Fears
Its Walk
Fell Short

ALAN HITSKY

JEWISH NEWS INTERN

Ms. Alterman said. "They re-
ally tell tales about what the
organization did..."
The archives project was
begun in 1991. Ms. Alterman,
volunteers and the Jewish
Historical Society have sort-
ed, recorded and cataloged.
Ms. Alterman encourages
groups and individuals who
want to access archival ma-
terial to call her at the Jew-
ish Federation, 642-4260; or
Les Huff at the Reuther Li-
brary, 577-4024.
She also recommends that
people with vintage pho-
tographs depicting Detroit or
Detroiters should consider
adding them to the archives:
"If a family has a photo we
deem valuable, we would re-
produce it and return the
original to them."

"We believe that suppress-
ing such viewpoints — no
matter how heinous — only
leaves them to fester and
grow," the editors wrote. "We
recognize that many of you
will disagree with our deci-
sion. However, we steadfast-
ly believe that the article is
relevant (if misguided), and
that it needs to be aired."
The letter by Bradley
Smith, director of the Com-
mittee for Open Debate on
the Holocaust, argued there
is no proof of genocide against
Jews.
Mr. Smith focused on the

/1

JENNIFER FINER

public viewing.
Kept in the temperature-
controlled Walter P. Reuther
Library at Wayne State Uni-
versity, the archives include
old photographs, scrapbooks,
even minutes of Jewish
agency meetings held decades
ago.
Nearly 70 years of history
are now available on micro-
film. Sharon Alterman, di-
rector of the archives, says
doctoral students and com-
munity leaders already have
sought information.
Hebrew Free Loan, for in-
stance, which is preparing for
its 80th anniversary celebra-
tion, is using the archives to
unearth old HFL documents.
"When you get into the nit-
ty-gritty of community
records, you find out a lot
about agency proceedings,"

YAD EZRA

feeeby tie .Tevil's hien

29

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