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October 15, 1993 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

October Savings.

SCHOOLS page 1

24 MONTHS 499 00 month*

.027PPMEMErgli

.;

Mazda 626 DX Sedan

$0 DOWN
month**
24 MONTHS $492°°

AIN 1104

N

1994 Continental Executive 4 Door
Preferred Equipment Pkg. 952A -
leather interior.

C 0 L N

ONTINENTAL

ARNOLD

E,ECL TI,E

SALE ENDS
OCTOBER 22

Automotive Group Ltd.

Gratiot Ave. at 12 Mile Road, Roseville, Michigan

" 24 month dosed end lease + 4% use tax. Up front payment consists of $207.00, 1st pat $250.00, security deposit $99.00, lic. + title, $2,000.00 cap reduc-

tion. 15,000 miles per year 80 per mile excess. Option to purchase $8,820.00

"'Closed end lease for qualified customer, lease payment of $492.00 for 24 months. 30,000 mile limitation, 110 per mile for excess mileage over 30,000 miles,
lessee has no obligation to purchase vehicle at lease end, lessee has option to purchase at lease end for $20,654.86, lessee responsible for excessive wear
and tear. Due at lease inception is first month's payment, and the refundable security deposit of $500.00 plus our percent use tax, license, and title fees. All

manufacturer's incentives assigned to dealer.

"Just



445-6080

S L -I.

Ma7Da

25 minutes from the Birmingham/Bloomfield area; off oft-696"

ARNOLD
MAZDA

MIA
12

(.0 . , ., iii

,

1 '696

MERCURY

Milo

LINCOLN

j!

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII

445-6000

(Detroit Monthly's BEST Teen Shopping - 7 993)

SEM1-ANNUAL

TRUNK SHOWING

OF

C.W. DESIGN DRESSES

FOR THAT SPECIAL OCCASION

THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY

26

Oct. 21
10-9

Oct. 22
10-6

Oct. 23
10-5:30

Oct. 24
12-5

IN ORCHARD MALL • ORCHARD LAKE RD. AT MAPLE RD. • 851-1260

Charter schools, similar to
private schools, could be start-
ed by citizens, non-profit agen-
cies or businesses. Interested
parties would apply to their lo-
cal school board for a charter.
Such alternative schools
would receive a standard foun-
dation grant or dollar amount
per pupil equal to that of pub-
lic schools. However, charter
schools may be exempt from
certain standards such as teach-
er certification.
Charter schools would differ
from day schools and private
schools in that they would be
accountable to the government.
"Depending on the regula-
tions, a day school might be able
to qualify as a charter school.
Whether or not religious insti-
tutions could sponsor such
schools has not yet been decid-
ed," said David Gad-Harf, ex-
ecutive director of the Jewish
Community Council. "It's a
tough issue. As a charter school,
a day school institution could
receive $4,500 per student. But
it might not want to put up with
a prohibitive curriculum or bu-
reaucracy and red tape."
Vouchers would act like
state-dollar scholarships. Public
funding allotted per student
could be used by parents to pay
for private schools. Vouchers
currently are not legal under
the Michigan constitution.
Because Hillel Day School
only conducts classes through
the eighth grade, Mr. Gad-Harf
believes parents enrolling their
children in that institution
might have the most mixed
emotions on the issue.
"Hillel parents are happy to
send their children to this
school. But when their children
graduate in eighth grade, most
of them finish up at public
schools," Mr. Gad-Harf said.
"While I'm sure they would like
to see Hillel get dollars, they
also want to guarantee the pub-
lic schools are in good order
when their children arrive."
Michael Traison, a Hillel par-
ent of two from West
Bloomfield, plans to send his
children to another day school
during their high school years.
He said he doesn't mind that
his taxes go toward public edu-
cation as that is an aspect of be-
ing a citizen and working
toward a greater good. But he
believes vouchers could act as
a sense of relief to day schools
and their parents.
As to the issue of charter
schools, Mr. Traison said not
enough has come to light to
make a decision.
"The separation of church
and state cannot be compro-
mised — even if that means
greater costs to parents like my-
self. I'm not yet sure which, if
any, of these proposals might
violate that principle," Mr.
Traison said.

Day school leaders are cau-
tiously supportive of vouchers,
but are waiting to see what a fi-
nal plan might look like.
"If private schools were in-
cluded in the voucher system, I
think it would increase enroll-
ment," said Barry Eisenberg,
executive director of Akiva
Hebrew Day School. "If people
really want to send their chil-
dren to day school, scholarships
can be worked out. But if fi-
nances are a family's only stum-
bling block, this could help
convince them."
Sarah Kahn, principal of
Darchei Torah, agreed and
added, "I think more choice for
parents would be positive. And
vouchers, if they included reli-
gious schools, would definitely
benefit day schools."
Ms. Kahn does not find the
issue problematic regarding the
separation of church and state
as parents can continue to
choose between public and pri-
vate schools.

The state will
have to replace
$6.5 billion in
property taxes.

"We don't have to be the
courts. They'll decide what is
constitutional," Ms. Kahn said.
The chairman of the board of
Yeshiva Beth Yehudah, Maury
Ellenberg, said, "I would like to
see an option in place that al-
lows maximum educational po-
tential for all students in a
school district and permits in-
dividuals paying taxes in a dis-
trict or in the state to have
access to the educational re-
sources of the state or district.
In relation to private schools,
this could be done by a cooper-
ative relationship to the school
district and permits increased
access to tuition and supplies or
by direct reimbursement."
Ms. Adler believes charter
schools could act as creative op-
tions. She said the same types
of standards must be upheld as
in public schools or charter
schools will not support a high
level of education.
Mindy Nathan, a member of
the Bloomfield Hills school
board, is more concerned about
vouchers. In 1994, the Michigan
constitution will be rewritten
as it is every 16 years. Vouchers
could be written in as legal.
Additional concepts going be-
fore the legislature include foun-
dation grants, taxes and school
choice.
Foundation grants, a stan-
dard amount designated by the
state for educating K-12 stu-
dents each year, are of special
interest to wealthier districts
such as Birmingham,

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