100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

September 24, 1993 - Image 102

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-09-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LEASE PER MONTH FOR 36 MONTHS
With capitalized cost reduction of $1,869

French Fries
War Is On

GALIT LIPKIS SPECIAL TO THE JEWISH NEWS

I

THE VOLVO BEST VALUE PROGRAM

.

VOLVO 9-U) SEDA N

Instead of paying a lot to live near work, why not pay a
little for standard features, including orthopedically
designed, leather-faced seats and a sunroof, along with a
supplemental restraint system with driver's side air bag,
a side impact protection system and anti-lock brakes-fea-
tures that make getting to work a lot more pleasant.

Now through Sept. 30, 1993

FREE FACTORY-SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE**

"VC101.217CO

Drive Safely

suburban

TOYOTA-VOLVO

IN THE TROY MOTOR MALL • 1821 MAPLELAWN, TROY (313) 643-8500

Offered by Volvo Car Finance. Inc. through participating Volvo dealers through Sept. 30, 1993. Subject lo credit approval and availability from existing dealer inventory Customers must take delivery by August 7, 1993. Dealer
prices may vary. Capitalized Cosl Reductions may be comprised of dealer and/or customer contributions, as well as trade-in allowances. Dealer contribution may affect customer cost. Payments based on a 36-month closed-
end lease for new 1993 900 Series models. "For example: A 944S sedan, with Level 1 option package and leather-laced interior, would require 36 payments of $349 a month, totaling $12,564. Different options and/or term
may aflect monthly payments. RASED ON A CUSTOMER CAPITALIZED COST REDUCTION OF 51.869 FOR THE 944S. Customer responsible at signing for the capitalized cost reduction, first monthly payment, $350
Relunclable Security Deposit, totaling $2568 plus insurance, taxes, title and registration lees. Customer liable throughout the lease for maintenance and repairs not included in the free maintenance offer. If customer does not
purchase the vehicle at lease end, customer responsible for mileage charge of $.15/mile over 15,030 miles per year, excess wear and tear, and a $250 disposition lee. Option to purchase at lease end for $12,925 plus any off
cial fees and taxes. "Free factory-scheduled maintenance available for 3 years or 50,030 miles, whichever comes lirst. See your authorized Volvo dealer for details of this lease program. ©1993 Volvo Car Finance, Inc. Drive
Safely is a trademark of Volvo Cars of North America, Inc.

BIG DADDY'S

PARTHENON

IS COMING!

C/)

w

Cf)

LU

CC
F-
LU

La.1

F-

102

(Finally, Greektown comes to the Suburbs)

BOB and I

want to thank all our friends for the
outpouring of love and support during
my illness. Your cards, calls and dona-
tions are greatly appreciated.

WITH LOVE V ROCHELLE LEDERMAN

When Clothes
Make The Difference,
We Make The Clothes

Mon.-Fri. 10-4

358-408'.:
Franklin Plaza
29107 Northwestern Hwy.
Southfleld (2nd entrance from 12 Mlle In rear)

srael's first McDonald's
is scheduled to open in
December 1993, with
some 10 to 30 franchises
opening throughont-the coun-
try within the next few years.
But its famous french fries
have been holding up the
works. The Ministry of Trade
and Industry's surprise an-
nouncement to conditionally
allow imported french-fry
potatoes, has pre-empted the
Supreme Court decision on
the issue and has got the
Minister of Agriculture —
who violently opposes impor-
ting french fries — up-in-
arms.
Having discovered that the
strain of potatoes they use are
not grown in Israel and that
existing processing facilities
do not cut to their specifica-
tions, McDonald's wanted to
import pre-cut frozen process-
ed potatoes. The Israeli
government, however, wanted
to protect local industry.
The government originally
rejected McDonald's request
to import potatoes because it
feared that blanket removal
of import barriers would
significantly harm the
revenues of thousands of
farmers and persons
employed in the sector. And,
in fact, the local hamburger
chain Burger Ranch did im-
mediately jump on the band-
wagon with a Supreme Court
peition also to be allowed
imports.
"From an economic and na-
tional standpoint, it is impor-
tant to guarantee the
domestic market to Israeli
farmers, on conditio that this
protection will not become a
hothouse for inefficiency,"
said Agriculture Minister
Ya ac ov Tsur.
Nevertheless, negotiations
continued. "We do not have
official permission," said
Omri Padan, McDonald's ap-
pointed franchisee for Israel.
"But the Ministry of Trade
and Industry knows we can-
not open, except with im-
ported potatoes."
In an attempt to resolve the
issue, Industry and Trade
Minister Micha Harish sug-
gested that McDonald's be
allowed to import frozen
french fries for a limited
period until local farmers and
processors can produce a pro-
duct to their specifications.
Mr. Tsur agreed and informed
potato growers that his
ministry will help them buy

seeds for the strain from
Europe.
"I am convinced Israeli
farmers will meet the
challenges McDonald's has
created and succeed in pro-
ducing the required variety at
reasonable prices," said Mr.
Tsur.
It was doubtful, however,
that even if the Tapud Potato
Processing Factory, the local
concern which has a monopo-
ly on fries supplies in Israel,
could meet the company's
demands, McDonald's would
want to be dependent on one
supplier. This especially as
Tapud, owned by nine kibbut-
zi, is deeply in debt and sear-
ching for a buyer.
The Farmers Association
claimed that french fry im-
ports would lead to Tapud's
collapse and threatened to
take action in the form of
public protests. An unnamed
official at the Ministry of
Trade and Industry claimed
the farmers we re
exaggerating.

The strain of
potatoes they use
is not grown in
Israel.

The farmers also argued
that McDonald's was using
its worldwide connections to
obtain lower prices at their
expense.
At the beginning of March,
McDonald's filed an official
complaint with the U.S. Free
Trade Office in Washington.'
It argued that Israel's at-
tempts to prevent the com-
pany from importing process-
ed french fries violated the
U.S.-Israel Free Trade Agree-
ment. Agriculture ministry
spokeswoman Batia Keinan
countered that agricultural
products aren't even covered-
by the FTA. McDonald's also
claimed that Israel is the on-
ly country that has created
difficulties. In reaction,
Israeli officials in Washington
said that McDonald's has
received "royal" treatment in
its requests for opening up
branches in Israel.
Compared with Burger
Ranch, which has 84 bran-
ches throughout the country,
this is unquestionobly true.
Burger Ranch has repeatedly
asked the goverm-n.-,-, t for a

FRENCH FRIES Dale 104

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan