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September 10, 1993 - Image 92

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-09-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

May the coming
year be filled
with- health and
happiness for
all our family
and friends.

HOWARD &
LINDA GOLDMAN
TRACIE, DAVID & BRADLEY

May the coming
year be filled
with health and
happiness for
all our family
and friends.

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year.
ANNE & SAM SUKENIC
HARVEY, KAREN, DOREEN & MARVIN

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year.

ALLAN & IRENE SPARAGE

JERRY &
COOKIE MARKOWITZ
ELISE, MINDY & DANA

Jewish Cuisine
Convention Held

NOGA TARNOPOLSKY

SPECIAL TO THE JEWISH NEWS

W

A Very Happy and Healthy
New Year to All Our Friends
and Family.

A Very Happy and Healthy
New Year to All Our Friends
and Family.
MARVIN & JUDITH DUBIN, SHELBY DUBIN &
DANIEL VICTOR, REBECCA ADASKIN

A Very Happy and Healthy
New Year to All Our Friends
and Family.

A Very Happy and Healthy
New Year to All Our Friends
and Family.

May the New Year Bring
To All Our Friends

and Family — Health,

Joy, Prosperity
and Everything
Good in Life.

11

CHARLOTTE &
HERBERT MITNICK

To All Our
Relatives
and Friends,
Our wish for a
year filled with
happiness,
health and prosperity.

MARLA PARKER,
BRAD GOLDBERG & JILL

hat is Jewish food?
The Jewish Inter-
national Conven-
tion on Jewish
Cuisine had some difficulties
providing answers to the
recurring quesion, as the last
time in history that all Jews
shared a common cuisine was
probably during the 40 years
of wandering in the Sinai
Desert. But it sure was fun for
the participants and
fascinating to the eating
public.
On the opening night, a
lovely, light summer evening,
the aroma of home-cooking
wafted over Zichron Tuvia,
Jerusalem's newest renovated
pedestrian mall. Thirty local
housewives in this traditional
Kurdish neighborhood have
spent the day cooking their
specialties.
Foreign guests, food writers
and researchers (Evelyn Rose
and Claudia Roden), wander
about the picturesque, tree-
lined boulevard as Mayor Ted-
dy Kollek wishes the hungry
crowd a hearty "B'tayevon!"
(Good appetite!). Eager guests
rush to taste the food being
served. "Calm down" yells
Sarah, one of the cooks. "If
you push me over you won't
get any couscous at all."
The couscous (steamed
semolina), is, in fact, plen-
tiful, and delicious, and is
served with squares of stew-
ed beef, raisins, prunes and
zucchini. It is followed by
stuffed vegetables, felafel,
"kube" (the traditional Mid-
dle Eastern fried dumpling)
and sweets. Musicians sit on
cement benches playing
Oriental music.
"What makes this typical
Jewish food?" Evelyn Rose is
asked. "It is food that could be
adapted to Jewish dietary
laws, wherever Jews were
dispersed." Today's rich culi-
nary heritage, a result of a
complex intermingling of
historical and sociological fac-
tors, reflects the lifestyle and
habits of Jews from many
lands.
The next day, the three-day
conference takes off in
earnest with a series of lec-
tures and workshops on
"What is Jewish Cuisine?,"
Institutional Cookery,"
"Cooking and the Media,"
"The Growing Popularity of
Cookbooks," etc.
Though sessions cost $30
each, an average of 100 peo-
ple, including a surprising

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