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August 27, 1993 - Image 46

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-08-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WORLD page 45

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When Goldstein received
an invitation to compete in
the 1993 Maccabiah
Games, "I told myself that
I was still capable of play-
ing well, so I should go and
enjoy the experience."
How's the right knee
today? Goldstein says: "It's
great." He doesn't even
need to use a brace when
he's playing badminton.
An operations supervi-
sor at Delco Electronics in
Flint, Goldstein is looking
forward to his September
marriage to Martha Cox.
"We've known each
other for eight years,"
Goldstein said. "She was
very supportive when I
wasgoing through my
rehabilitation."
For Stegman, the
Maccabiah Games were
memorable for many rea-
sons.
"They were great... won-
derful... a ton of fun," the
teen-ager bubbled. "I met
so many people from all
over the United States and
the world and I made a lot
of friends.
"It was interesting get-
ting to know other Jewish
kids who also are so
involved in swimming. If
anyone has a chance to go
to the Maccabiah Games
in four years, I'd definitely
recommend it."
Because he was going to
compete against 16-year-
olds in Israel, Stegman
wondered how he'd do. He
answered his doubts by
coming through with out-
standing performances.
Stegman, who will be a
sophomore this fall at
West Bloomfield High
School, is one of the
United States' top young
butterfly swimmers. One
of his bronze medals at the
Maccabiah games came in
the 100 butterfly.
He won the 100 and 200
butterfly in the boys ages
13-14 division at the U.S.
Swimming Short Course
and Long Course State
Championships this year
and his 1:01.39 clocking at
the Long Course meet last
month should rank among
the top 20 times in the
nation.
Last winter, swimming
for West Bloomfield as a
freshman, Stegman quali-
fied for the high school
Class A state meet in the
100 butterfly. He was

clocked in 54.4 and fin-
ished 22nd.
When he isn't competing
for West Bloomfield,
Stegman swims for the
Farmington Hills-based
Michigan Stingrays club
team. Last week, he com-
peted for the Detroit
Maccabi team at the
regional youth games in
St. Louis.
It was the first trip to
the Maccabiah Games for
Shenkman, but the 13th
time he was in Israel.
There was nothing
unlucky about his 13th
visit.
"The experience was
indescribable," Shenkman
said. "It was like being

The experience
was abetted by a
number of medals.

born again. I can't tell you
how I felt when the
American team was given
a standing ovation by the
65,000 people who
watched the Opening
Ceremonies in Tel Aviv.
"I felt a real sense of
pride and solidarity the
entire time I was there.
You couldn't help but feel
it."
Shenkman, who was
born in Vilna, Poland, also
couldn't prevent himself
from offering a prayer
after he won his third gold
medal. Injured in the bat-
tle of Stalingrad in 1943,
he was hospitalized for
eight months and, after
nearly losing his leg, he
was told he'd never be able
to walk without a cane.
That prediction never
materialized. Shenkman
didn't let it. He's been an
athlete all his life, special-
izing in swimming and fig-
ure skating. During the
past 12 years, he's won
nearly 20 medals in swim-
ming and speed walking at
the Michigan Senior
Olympics.
"After I won my third
gold medal at the
Maccabiah Games, I
thought about what all the
doctors had told me, and
for the first time, I
thanked God that they
were wrong," said
Shenkman, who moved to
Detroit in 1949.

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