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August 27, 1993 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-08-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'93 Campaign Allocations
Reveal New Priorities

RUTH LITTMANN STAFF WRITER

I

n a meeting Tuesday
night, the Jewish
Federation's board of
governors handed down
the final decisions on allo-
cations from the 1993
Allied Jewish Campaign.
The decisions, leaders
say, reflect new priorities
for Detroit's Jewish com-
munity: programs target-
ing young people, rather
than those assisting popu-
lations at risk.
That means more
Campaign money will go to
educational and enrich-
ment programs than to
programs supporting the
Jewish poor, unemployed,
sick and elderly.
"Allocating money is a
painful process. Nobody
wants to harm populations
at risk," said Norman Katz,
one of the allocation com-
mittee leaders. "But the
community as a whole has
said it is going to empha-
size Jewish continuity. If
we don't work to solve
problems like intermar-
riage, we won't have Jews
around in 30 years."
Locally, agencies in the
category of "Jewish educa-
tion" received the largest
overall increase, up
$103,000 from last year.
An increase of $87,000
went to culture and group
services.
In accordance with this
year's priorities,
Federation allocated the
community services divi-
sion, which includes agen-
cies like Jewish Vocational
Service and Hebrew Free
Loan, the smallest
increase, only $49,000.
Jewish Federation
Apartments (JFA) also is
part of the community ser-
vices division. JFA, which
provides approximately
620 elderly with assisted
living quarters, received a
$4,470 cut in its allocation
for its subsidized meal pro-
gram.
Alan Goodman, executive
director of Jewish Family
Service, says the $7,500
increase his agency
received does not keep pace
with the rate of inflation.
Neither does it compensate
for the $42,604 cut in
United Way funding, he
said. With upcoming union
negotiations and a denied

request for Federation
funding of JFS's West
Bloomfield branch, Mr.
Goodman is concerned
about his agency's welfare
next year.
"Everything is hitting us
at the same time," he said.
"The combination puts us
in a difficult position for
1994. What it will lead to is
an inevitable cutting back

"We think
everybody was
treated extremely
fairly."

Peter Alter

of services and a reduction
of personnel."
Like Mr. Goodman, JFA
executive director Marcia
Goldsmith is resigned to
this year's allocation. Both
say they understand that
the community must, at
times, reassess priorities.
To mitigate the effects of
low allocations, the agen-
cies have sought other
sources of funding, in the
form of private endow-
ments or federal grants.
"These are very, very
tough times and the
Campaign dollars won't go
far," said Larry Ziffer,
Federation's director of
planning and agency rela-
tions. "We end up with a
fixed number of dollars to
allocate and an unlimited
number of demands. In the
allocation process, nothing
happens by formula.
There's no easy way to
make these decisions."
The allocation decisions
are not made in a "dark,
smoke-filled room," where
big-givers exercise their
Campaign muscle -
though this seems to be the
misconception of many peo-
ple, Mr. Ziffer said. In fact,
Tuesday's decision by the
Federation's board of gov-
ernors comes after 12
months of deliberations by
agency staff and laypeople.
"Allocations are merely
the culmination of a year-
long planning process," Mr.
Ziffer said.
Agencies that receive
money from the Campaign

are grouped into three
major divisions: Jewish
education, culture and
group services, and com-
munity services. Each is
represented by a chairman,
associate chairman and
committee of laypeople.
Throughout the year,
these people determine the
needs of their respective
agencies. Each spring, all
agencies make formal pre-
sentations to their divi-
sions and present budgets
requesting a certain
amount of money from the
Campaign pot.
In early June, after the
Campaign closes,
Federation's board of gov-
ernors meets to decide how
much Campaign money
will go to local needs, and
how much will be directed
to Israel and overseas
causes.
The Campaign brought
in nearly $26.9 million this
year - up almost $1 mil-
lion from 1992. Of the
Campaign's $23,763,250 in
funds available for alloca-
tion, 60 percent
($14,119,950) will go to
Israel and overseas causes.
About 40 percent of the
total will go to domestic
agencies. Included in that
amount is $569,850 for
national agencies, like
National Tay Sachs and
the Jewish Labor
Committee.
The $3.1 million differ-
ence between the total
Campaign revenue and
amount of funds available
for allocation reflects the
cost of fund raising, money
put aside for next year and
a reserve for uncollectable
pledges.
Earlier this summer, the
division chairmen met to
decide how revenue will be
split between their divi-
sions. Through lengthy
negotiations, the division
chairmen - Mr. Katz, Mr.
Rosenthal and Irwin
Alterman - divvied up
$7,592,262 between their'
three divisions2This was
more than $500,000 more
than divisions were given
last year.
The division chairmen
subsequently went back to
their respective committees
with their part of the
Campaign pie, which corn-

Campaign Allocations

JEWISH EDUCATION

93-94

Agency for Jewish Education
Akiva Hebrew Day School
Hillel Day School
Transportation Service
Yeshiva Beth Yehudah
Yeshiva Gedola
Supplementary School
Scholarship Fund

850,000
200,000
299,000
18,600
300,000
35,000

92-93

899,000
197,000
273,000
8,600
270,000
27,000

75,000

COMMUNITY SERVICES

55,000
1,236,415
27,428
864,376
1,050
59,150
690,543
278,700

54,680
1,228,915
31,898
831,376
1,050
50,000
687,043
278,700

35,000
460,000
88,600
98,500
170,450
1,242,450
507,000

25,000
450,000
73,600
90,500
156,450
1,227,450
492,000

514,433

514,433

625,000
191,755
150,000

564.063
176,040
150,000

$13,928,160
10,000
62,790
50,000

13,722,622
10,000
89,700
46,075

68,500
48,000
68,500

70,000
50,000
70,000

2,700

2,700

2,716
49,850

1,600
46,500

2,018
2,000

900
2,000

2,716

1,600

52,000
24,000
6,000

53,755
26,000
6,000

6,840

6,840

3,000
900
3,400

3,000
900
3,400
900
2,660
224,050

Hebrew Free Loan Association
Jewish Family Service
Jewish Federation Apartments
Jewish Home for Aged
Jewish House of Shelter
Jewish Information Service
Jewish Vocational Service
Resettlement Service

CULTURE AND GROUP SERVICES

B'nai B'rith Youth Organization
Fresh Air Society
Hillel Foundation - Metro Detroit
Hillel Foundation - MSU
Hillel Foundation - U of M
Jewish Community Center
Jewish Community Council

OTHER

Capital Needs (various agencies)
Jewish Federation
of Metropolitan Detroit
National Dues (CJF, LCBC, etc.)
Sinai Hospital

OVERSEAS

United Jewish Appeal
America-Israel Cultural Foundation
Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS)
Jewish Telegraphic Agency

NATIONAL AGENCIES

American Jewish Committee
American Jewish Congress
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith
Association of Jewish Family
and Children's Agencies
Baltimore Institute
for Jewish Communal Service
B'nai B'rith National Youth Services (Hillel)
Brandeis University Hornstein Program
in Jewish Communal Service
Center for Jewish Studies
Hebrew Union College School
of Jewish Communal Service
Jewish Community Centers Association
of North America (formerly JWB)
Jewish Labor Committee
Jewish War Veterans
National Association
of Jewish Vocational Services
National Jewish Center
for Learning and Leadership (CLAL)
National Tay-Sachs Association
North American Jewish Students Appeal
Project Interchange
Synagogue Council of America
Joint Budgeting Council

2,660
224,050

(Jewish Education Service of North America, National Conference
on Soviet Jewry, National Foundation for Jewish Culture,
National Jewish Community Relations Advisory Council)
*The Joint Budgeting Council comingles the funds it receives
from Detroit and ten other communities.

CO

0)

Cr)

mittee members then
divided up between agen-
cies in their division. The
last step in the allocation
process was obtaining
approval from Federation's
board of governors.
This happened, without
complications, on Tuesday,
Mr. Ziffer said.

"I think the allocation
process proceeded extreme-
ly well," said Peter Alter,
allocations committee
chairman. "I think (the
outcome) reflects a consen-
sus of what the priorities
in the community are. We
think everybody. was treat-
ed extremely faiily."

ti

CD

13

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