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August 20, 1993 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-08-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CONVERT YOUR JEWELRY
TO CASH!!

Fine jewelry is to be worn, You have worn and enjoyed it for many years, Are you
still wearing it or is it sitting in a drawer or a safe deposit box?

Robert Grant can turn your jewelry that you are not wearing into cash at the
fairest, most favorable prices.

Bob has more than 30 years experience in purchasing and selling jewelry. Over
the last 10 years, he has been liquidating major jewelry stores throughout the
United States and is now offering his services to you. You can be assured of
complete discretion. All arrangements will be kept in the strictest of confidence.

Call R.L. Grant & Associates today to make an appointment. There is no
obligation. By calling Bob, you will have the information you need to make an
informed, good decision.

R.L. Grant & Associates

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CONSULTANTS FOR THE JEWELRY INDUSTRY

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(313) 851-7333

•Minimum Deposit $1,000

•Monthly Compounding

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Find It All In
The Jewish News
Classifieds
Call 354-5959

Hillel Transformation
Is Now Under Way

Richard Joel believes Hillel can help stem
assimilation among college students.
But he needs the resources to do so.

JAMES D. BESSER WASHINGTON CORRESPONDENT

S

uddenly, the entire
Jewish community is
talking about continu-
ity. But talk is cheap,
and programs that can help
lure new a generation to
Jewish life can be expen-
sive.
That's the dilemma facing
Richard Joel, the dynamic
leader of the B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundations — a
group that is doing as much
as any on the continuity
front.
Mr. Joel and his team at
Hillel's downtown
Washington offices are turn-
ing the organization upside
down in an effort to give it
the tools necessary to wage
the continuity battle.
However, mere survival is
not enough for the inventors
of the "new Hillel." In a time
of widespread retrench-
ment, the Hillel leadership
is audaciously proposing a
major expansion that will
end its status as a much
admired, but chronically
underfunded stepchild of
the Jewish communal
world.
But their go-for-broke
strategy will pay off only if
the entire community —
from big-spending philan-
thropists on down — makes
a major investment in what
Mr. Joel and his staff opti-
mistically call a "strike force
for positive Jewish identi-
ty."
Mr. Joel, an attorney by
profession, but an enthusi-
ast by nature who elicits an
unusual degree of praise
from American Jewish lead-
ers, arrived at Hillel in 1988
to find a demoralized staff
and a program that lacked
both money and focus.
The group's balance
sheets were bleak. Local
federations, which con-
tribute $8.5 million of
Hillel's annual $18-million
budget, were being dragged
down by the worsening
economy; B'nai B'rith,
Hillel's parent organization,
was careening towards
insolvency.
In three years, B'nai
B'rith cut almost $2 million
from the Hillel budget.
"B'nai B'rith has decided,

Richard Joel: "We have to
aggresively pick pockets."

for the good of the services
rendered on the campus,
that it's important to posi-
tion Hillel where it can grow
and expand beyond what we
have been able to do," said
Sidney Clearfield, B'nai
B'rith executive vice presi-
dent.
While he indicated that
no additional budget cuts
are planned, he noted that
it all depends on the success
of B'nai B'rith's all-out effort
to reverse its own fiscal
decline.
Almost as daunting for
Mr. Joel was the fact that
the institutional culture at
Hillel was worn out by the
time he arrived on the
scene.
"I came into an organiza-
tion that was defensive,
that was angry that the
world didn't share their
vision of positive Jewish
identity," Mr. Joel said.
"People were tired of being
tired; they were tired of
fighting, and of being defen-
sive."
The irony was that Hillel
was losing steam at a time
when changing conditions
on campus presented
unprecedented opportuni-
ties for the 70-year old orga-
nization.
"More and more, we were
starting to see students
reengaging in issues," he
said. "It's the end of the 'I'll
go to college, be an invest-
ment banker and buy a
Porsche' era. And there are
the beginnings of the reex-
ploration of spirituality."

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