100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

August 20, 1993 - Image 142

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-08-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THIS FALL,
YOU'LL FIND
A HOME IN
STYLE.

S TYLE

Israel Welcomes
Lebanese Army

NOW COVERS MORE THAN EVER. EVERY EXCITING

ISSUE OF STYLE IS PACKED WITH LOCAL FASHION, HOME

DESIGN, ENTERTAINING, FOOD, GARDENING AND EVERYTHING

ELSE THAT TODAY'S SOPHISTICATED, EDUCATED AND VALUE—

CONSCIOUS CONSUMERS ARE INTERESTED IN. THAT'S WHY YOU

SHOULD BE IN STYLE, TOO.

WITH ITS CIRCULATION CONCENTRATED IN THE MOST AFFLUENT

PARTS OF OAKLAND COUNTY, AMERICA'S 3RD WEALTHIEST,

STYLE REACHES THE PEOPLE WHO MATTER TO YOU THE

MOST. AND NO OTHER LOCAL PUBLICATION CAN DELIVER THIS

QUALITY OF READERSHIP.

SO GET INTO STYLE

THIS FALL... CONTACT ONE OF OUR

STYLISH SALES REPRESENTATIVES OR AMY OPPER AT 354-6060 TO

RESERVE YOUR ADVERTISING SPACE IN STYLE. WE COVER IT ALL.

ADVERTISING DEADLINE: SEPTEMBER 8TH. ISSUE: WEEK OF OCTOBER 11.

STYLE

We Deliver Affluent Oakland County

142

P u is L I s

E

u

B y

T H

DETRO,IT

JEWISH

NE

w s

Tel Aviv (JTA) — Israel has
cautiously welcomed the
deployment of Lebanese
troops in southern Lebanon,
but says the real test of the
move's effectiveness will be
whether these troops suc-
ceed in stopping the violence
in the border region.
With American support
and tacit approval from the
Israelis and Syrians, the
Lebanese government mov-
ed some 300 troops into four
villages facing Israel's
security zone in southern
Lebanon.
The villages are near the
port city of Tyre in a region
that continues to be pa-
trolled by the nine-nation
United Nations Interim
Force in Lebanon.
Diplomatic sources said
that U.N. Secretary-General
Boutros Boutros-Ghali was
initially against the
Lebanese deployment be-
cause of technical problems
of having Lebanese soldiers
in U.N.-controlled territory.
But Mr. Boutros-Ghali
finally accepted the recom-
mendations of the U.N.
Secretariat staff and chang-
ed his mind over the
weekend, the sources said.
Following the American-
brokered cease-fire in the
region on July 31, the
Lebanese government decid-
ed to order the deployment
in an effort to maintain
security and to help resettle
refugees.
An estimated 250,000
Lebanese civilians fled north
and some 30,000 houses
were destroyed during
Israel's weeklong shelling of
southern Lebanon in the last
week of July.
Under the terms of the
cease-fire, the Islamic fun-
damentalist Hezbollah
agreed to stop firing
Katyusha rockets into nor-
thern Israel.
Arriving Lebanese soldiers
were armed with rifles,
machine guns and anti-tank
rockets in what is the first
such deployment in the
battle-weary region for 11
years.
The deployment was scal-
ed down from an original
total of some 1,000 troops to
the 300 currently in the area
because Syria reportedly
feared a larger deployment
might lead to clashes with
Hezbollah.
Lebanese government
leaders have been eager to
reassure the local militia

bands that the newly arrived
troops have no intention of
disarming the Hezbollah.
The Lebanese government
extended these reassurances
by saying that the Hezbollah
have "a natural right" to
continue their activities as
long as there are Israeli
forces in southern Lebanon.
The remark has provoked
concerns as to whether
Lebanese and UNEFEL forces
will cooperate or whether
their close proximity will
lead to friction.
Meanwhile, international
aid for the battered southern
region began arriving in
Beirut.
Three planes from Saudi
Arabia landed at Beirut
Airport with 29 tons of med-
icine and equipment for
civilians in the southern re-
gion. The Saudis have
airlifted some 269 tons of
relief supplies since the'
cease-fire went into effect.
Another 34 tons of food
and medicine reportedly
arrived today from Morocco
and Italy.

Inflation
Low In July

Tel Aviv (JTA) — Israel's
cost-of-living index rose by a
low 0.1 percent during July,
the Central Bureau of
Statistics announced.
This marks the third mon-
th in a row that living costs
rose by a small amount, and
economists are thus predic-
ting that the annual infla-
tion rate for 1993 will be just
10 percent.
During the first six mon-
ths of 1993, the index was up
by just 5.8 percent.
In fact, a trend appears to
have been set with the cost
of living increases declining
0.1 percent every month
since May. In that month,
the cost of living rose by 0.3
percent, and in June, it was
up only 0.2 percent.
The small increase, which
had been anticipated based
on the preceding two mon-
ths' figures, was kept down,
as before, by seasonal reduc-
tions in the cost of fruit,
vegetables, clothing and
footwear and a decline in
housing costs.
The declines were
countered by only small in-
creases in the costs of edu-
cation, recreation, culture
and transportation. ❑

'

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan