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August 13, 1993 - Image 24

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-08-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PUT A CLASSIC
IN YOUR KITCHEN

BUS page 23

Product Of
The Month

ISE

IN-SINK-ERATOR

Food Waste Disposer

Heavy duty 3/4 H.P. motor grinds through the
toughest food waste ■ Wear resistant nickel chrome
shredder ring ■ Stainless steel rotating shredder and
grinding elements.
Model 77



Our most popular,
best value disposer.
Built with exacting
quality and care that
In-Sink-Erator is known
for. And the work
saving features that
busy families demand.
They are engineered
to deliver top
performance plus
reliability, efficiency
and a full 5-year
warranty.

Hut, a Kentucky Fried
Chicken —junk food still,
but class, American junk
food.
Israel's snootiest clothing
and swim wear shops —
Rosh Indiani and Gottex —
are also putting up their
shingles.
Inside the walls are cool
gray, with ramps and esca-
lators encased in gray con-
crete swooping this way and
that. There's so much air
and space; it features a sky-
light four stories high that
provides that gives you the
feeling of walking through
an indoor, geometrically
angular canyon.
There are spiffy signs all
over the place, telling you
which bus boards where.
Best of all, the whole place
is air conditioned. Visiting
the station a little more

than a week before its open-
ing, I came away convinced
that no one will be able to
figure out where they're
going, and that even if they
do, they will never get to
their bus in time because
the station is just so damn
big.
It's also antiseptic. It's a
gigantic indoor shopping
mall with transportation.
There will be no beggars
here. No hustlers shouting
into microphones, no boom
boxes, no humid stench. No
cheap thrills, no cheap any-
thing. None of the mess of
life.
But if the only other
option is what was — the
rancid old bus station —
then Israel is, on balance,
probably better off marching
bravely into its brave new
future. ❑

(

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Aircraft Workers
Stage A Strike

Tel Aviv (JTA) — Employees
of Israel Aircraft Industries
held a rowdy one-day strike
and went on a spree of van-
dalism outside their head-
quarters at Ben-Gurion Air-
port.
The strike was a reaction
to delays in the payment of a
portion of the workers' July
salaries, which had been due
in their bank accounts last
week.
Strikers raged through
IAI's headquarters, break-
ing property, including fur-
niture and computers in and
outside the building.
Police were finally
summoned when unruly
crowds blocked the main
approach to the road to Petach
Tikvah.
The IAI workers also held
strikes last week to protest
the implementation of an
economic recovery plan
designed by IAI to help the
company overcome a series
of economic blows that hit
what was one of the coun-
try's major employers.
The company's problems
began a decade ago with a
government decision to halt
plans to build the locally
designed Lavi fighter plane,
which was to have been

largely funded by American
money.
IAT's problems grew more
serious with the end of the
Cold War, which led to
worldwide cutbacks in

defense outlays.
The future of the company
now depends largely on
whether the United States
will continue to cover most
of the development costs of
the Arrow anti-missile mis-
sile, a joint American-Israeli
project currently in its pro-
totype-testing stage.
Without continued Ameri-
can funding, the project will
certainly be canceled,
leading potentially to an end
to all IAI operations.
The company's recovery
plan involves the firing of

The strike was a
reaction to delays
in the payment
of a portion
of the workers'
July salaries.

some 1,500 workers — in ad-
dition to more than 1,500
others who have already
been fired — and 15 percent
wage cuts for those remain-
ing.
The company told its
workers that they would
receive the remaining pay-
ment of their July salaries
by the end of the week. ❑

(,

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