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August 13, 1993 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-08-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Daniel Gordon listens to Nancy Vardy's lesson.

Jeffrey Weberman of
West Bloomfield is 9 years
old and a LIFE student. His
mother, Carol, couldn't be
happier.
"My family was looking
for a new synagogue and I
was checking out the differ-
ent education programs. I
was pleased to see LIFE's
family workshops. It forces
us all to make the time to
spend together," Ms.
Weberman said. "The pro-
gram encourages the entire
family to attend synagogue.
And Jeffrey loves it. He's
very happy."
Next year, Ms. Weber-
man will volunteer time to
help at family workshops.
Rabbi Pachter isn't sur-
prised.
"Most parents participate
to the extent we ask them
to. For those parents who
take on that responsibility,
it works quite well," he said.
Ms. Vardy will continue
to develop curriculum for
the older students, especial-
ly grades six through eight.

She plans to work with
Jewish Experiences For
Families and utilize their
programs.
Monday afternoons will
be spent in bar mitzvah
training.
Wednesdays will be
devoted to a new program
developed by the Melitz
Centers for Jewish Zionist
Education called "Numbers
2,000." Students trace their
family roots through the
study of artifacts and docu-
ments and conducting inter-
views. A video component is
included. The students'
work will culminate in an
exhibition.

Parents also
attend
workshops.

"They'll learn where they
came from and hopefully
start thinking about where
they are going," Ms. Vardy
said. ❑

Borman Hall Submits
Correction Proposal

RUTH LITTMANN STAFF WRITER

T

he Michigan Depart-
ment of Public Health
last week gave
Borman Hall adminis-
trators 10 days to draft a
plan for correcting code
violations, cited after
the Home's inspection in
July.
MDPH Licensing Officer
Delphine Shott will review
the plan of correction, which
must be submitted to the

state today. The plan will
propose ways for improving
four areas cited as deficient
in the MDPH's written
report. The four Level A
deficiencies include:
resident care, nursing
services, administration
and assessment of resi-
dents' welfare and activi-
ties.
Ms. Shott and other
MDPH officials will deter-

ichelle Levy will
never go back to
Poland.
After recently
returning, the 19-year-old
West Bloomfield resident
said "once is enough."
However, she will always
remember the emotional
experience.
Ms. Levy visited Poland
en route to Israel.
Looking for a short, sum-
mer trip before returning to
Michigan State University,
Ms. Levy approached the
Israel Desk at the Jewish
Community Center. She
decided on the American
Zionist Youth Foundation
jaunt to Czechoslovakia,
Poland and Israel called
"Frona the Walls of
Destruction to the Walls of
Redemption."
Ms. Levy was one of 27
participants, the only one
from Michigan.
"I had no idea what I was
getting into," Ms. Levy said.
Leaving July 18, Ms.
Levy first arrived in
Czechoslovakia, where she
spent one day exploring the
old Jewish quarter. About
24 hours later she was
traveling by train to
Krakow for two days, then
rode a bus for three hours to
Warsaw.
"We went through the
con e ntration camps
k ena„

,

Trip participants walked through a memorial at Treblinka.

Ghetto Uprising," Ms. Levy
said.
Ms. Levy was astonished
by the blatant anti-
Semitisrn she heard on the
streets of Warsaw. On one
occasion a resident said "Go
home, Jews" to the group.
At the sites of the death
camps, Ms. Levy was awe-
struck.
"I've learned about the
Holocaust, all my life: But
learning about it and seeing
it — my God," Ms. Levy
said. We went day after
day to the different camps.
The last day, at Treblink

ing left of the Warsaw
Ghetto except a wall which
now keeps people out of an
apartment building. The
apartments, which look like
New York brownstones, are
built into the old syna-
gogue. Hebrew letters and a
clock with Hebrew numbers
remain at the top," Ms.
Levy said.
"But I can't believe that a
handful ofJews stay there."
Following five days in
Poland, the group flew into
Tel Aviv for 11 days in
Israel.

mine whether the 212-bed
nursing home in Detroit is
capable of making the
improvements outlined
within the plan.
This is the third time in
12 months the Home has
been cited with serious code
violations, and licensing
officials say they look nega-
tively upon repeat infringe-
ments.
However, if the MDPH
determines that Borman
Hall is capable of carrying
out its plan of correction, it
will give the Home between
45 and 90 days to come into
compliance before another
state inspection.
If MDPH officials decide
the Home is not qualified to

BORMAN page 16

Borman resident George Klein is visited by his wife, Olga.

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