100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

June 25, 1993 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-06-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MONEYSAVING COUPONS INSIDE

DETROIT

7 50

6 TAMMUZ/JUNE 25, 1993

Knollenberg Erases
Israel Question Mark

Rep. Joe Knollenberg has done some homework. Now he is
asking his colleagues to support foreign aid.

KIMBERLY LIFTON STAFF WRITER

ep. Joe Knollenberg,
R-Birmingham, had
one thing on his mind
when he ran for
Congress last year:
the economy.
Yet six months into
his job as representa-
tive for Michigan's
11th Congressional
District, Mr. Knollen-
berg has taken on a new interest:
foreign aid.
The man who rarely discussed the
issue before November devoted sev-
eral days last month to lobbying the
48-member freshman Republican
House class for passage of the $12.9
billion foreign aid appropriation bill.
Israel, which is set to get $3 bil-
lion this year from the United States,
generally is the largest recipient of
U.S. foreign aid.
The bill last week passed the
House by an overwhelming majori-

Rep. Joe Knollenberg

ty. The Senate is expected to vote on
the appropriations bill some time in
July.
"I have been working with lead-
ership and other freshmen to get
them to look at the foreign aid bill
— to look at it as a good investment,"

KNOLLENBERG page 26

Inside

BUSINESS

Capturing
The Moments

Palate's Delight

or 20 years, Mark Nemzin had little to do
with Judaism. It all started with a synagogue
in northwest Detroit, which refused the 13-
year-old Mark the chance to daven because
he didn't have High Holy Day tickets.
Then Mr. Nemzin married, had children and
chanced to join Temple Israel. It was a
decision that changed his life.
Today, Mr. Nemzin is part of the Temple
Israel Minyannaires. Fourteen temple
members belong to the group and regularly
lead shiva services at private homes.

The Miny

Story page 44

i es

Israeli companies learn
the U.S. game.

Page 30

BACKGROUND

Pepsi-Less

Israel has its own
Israel
crisis with Pepsi.

Page 49

Contents on page 3

Story on page 77

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan