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May 28, 1993 - Image 50

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-05-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thanks Billions!

TWO FAMILIES page 49

(Actually More, But We
Lost Count Decades Ago)

Michigan's Largest Independently
Owned _Mortgage Banker, Period.

• Stability — Serving homeowners for nearly 50 years.
• Service — A commitment to 7-10 day approval time.
• Low rates — Always.

173A 11
, MEMBER

DAR

Manny Rice (on far right) with friends.

FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC.

Serving Homeowners Since 1946

24445 Northwestern Highway, Suite 100, Southfield

313-827-2436

LINDA SOLOMON PHOTO EXHIBIT

June 7-21, 1993

Opening Reception

and

Book Signing

June 7th 7:30-9:30 p.m.

Jewish Community Center
6600 West Maple Rd.
West Bloomfield

Linda is a nationally recognized photojournalist. She has
been a Detroit News Columnist and photographed the Star's

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First of Michigan
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Members New York Stock Exchange, Int

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INVESTMENTS

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On The Boardwalk

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Herman Schwartz

Senior Vice President - Investments
Branch Manager

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Find It All In
The Jewish News
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into sports," Eugene
Lemberg says. "But with
Dad it was always, 'study,
study, study.' "
Today, Eugene remem-
bers his father as a fami-
ly-oriented man, deter-
mined that his children
watch their pennies, but
generous almost to a
fault. "He would always
expect me to have some
money in my pocket,"
Eugene says. "But I could
call him up and say, 'I
need $5,000' and his only
response would be, Will
10 a.m. tomorrow be soon
enough?'"
Howard Rice, who
today lives in Miami
Beach, also describes his
father, a longtime mem-
ber of Congregation
Shaarey Zedek, as a man
dedicated to the store and
his family.
As young men, both
Howard and Irving
worked at Weitzman-
Lemberg-Rice Hardware.
"It was a classic, old-time
hardware store" in a
mostly Italian neighbor-
hood, Howard says. In
addition to hammers and
nails, the store sold wine
presses.
After serving in the
U.S. Army, Eugene
Lemberg returned in 1955
to oversee the business at
Weitzman Hardware. He,
Irving Rice, Benjamin
Lemberg and Manuel Rice
worked together, a part-
nership that lasted until
Manuel's death in 1964.
Irving later left the busi-
ness alto g ether.
Eugene Lemberg had
worked in the store as a
boy; now, he gave similar
jobs to his own sons, Jeff
and Doug. They kept the

business going through
the toughest times,
including numerous rob-
beries (two thieves once
bore a tunnel through the
walls, causing $30,000 in
damage.)
It was the 1967 riots
that finally did them in.
When he heard news of
the trouble, Eugene
grabbed a backpack,
"threw in some cigarettes,
some whiskey, canned
food, ammunition, a
change of underwear and
went down there for four
days. I saved my property
and my building. Nobody
was going to burn me
out."
Then,
in
1971,
Benjamin Lemberg died
and, soon after, Eugene
closed the business. The
property was sold in May
1986. Today, the site of
the former Weitzman
Hardware is an empty lot.
Like their fathers,
Eugene Lemberg and
Howard Rice remain com-
mitted to family.
In
1983, Eugene
learned that a distant
cousin, Nikolai, had left
Russia with his family
and was waiting in
Austria for permission to
enter the United States.
Eugene helped arrange
for his immigration here.
Today, Nikolai is the
head of a successful busi-
ness on Detroit's east
side.
"I guess he's my second
or third cousin, some-
thing like that," Eugene
Lemberg says. "It doesn't
matter. I feel I'm follow-
ing in my father's foot-
steps by helping out fami-
ly."
Almost all the rest of

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