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April 16, 1993 - Image 102

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-04-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

EAT
T WELL EAT SMART EAT KOSHER AND FOR THE FINEST OF KOSHER PRODUCTS
L ook for this emblem and be a name
Association who sells only the finest of

not a number by shopping at a
member market of the Detroit area
Retail Kosher Meat Dealers

select kosher products which are
certified kosher by a recognized
Orthodox rabbinical council

ttt

SUNDAY APRIL 18th THROUGH
FRIDAY, APRIL 23rd

WE HOPE YOU ENJOYED A HEALTHY AND SATISFYING
PASSOVER HOLIDAY!
PLEASE CALL US OR COME BY FOR
THIS WEEK'S SPECIALS.
WE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU!!

COHEN'S KOSHER MEAT & POULTRY MARKET

STORE HOURS:
Sunday 8:30-5:00
Monday - Thursday 9:00 - 6:00
Friday 9:30 - 3:00

6734 Orchard Lake Road, near Maple
in the West Bloomfield Plaza, West Bloomfield
PHONE 932-3930 & 932-3931

OUR FAMILY HAS BEEN SERVING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY FOR
OVER 70 YEARS, MICHAEL COHEN, OWNER-OPERATOR

Established 1920

OUR MEMBER MARKETS FEATURE THE FINEST SELECTED EMPIRE KOSHER POULTRY.
BROUGHT IN FRESH DAILY FOR YOU THE CONSUMING PUBLIC TO ENJOY YOUR WAY.

6088 W. MAPLE AT FARMINGTON RD. • W. Bloomfield • 851-9666

FRESH SMOKED WHOLE

LAKE SUPERIOR

WHITEFISH

SPECIALS - APR. 1 6- 1 7- 1 8

3 DAYS ONLY!

Sitting Pretty

$

COLLEGE TUITION GRANT
FALL 1993

RETIREMENT SALE
FINAL 2 WEEKS

OAKLAND CENTURY LODGE
111111
OLARSHIP

EVERYTHING MUST GO
60% - 75% OFF

Student Requirements:

Patio & Indoor Furniture, Tables, Lamps,
Leather & Formica Furniture

Layaways & previous sales excluded Permit #37

Evergreen Plaza 19747 W. 12 Mile, Southfield 552-8850

Hours: M-W 10-6, Thurs. 10-7, Fri. & Sat. 10-6, Sun. 12-4

358-2333
IM FRANKLIN
PLAZA

I of Southfield I

r

; FILM PROCESSING

• P ASSPORT
SPECIAL

$

795 $ 1 4 95

1 set


2 Sets
"Must Be Done At The Same Time"
2 Photos per passport (with coupon)

L

J

1

102

I $3.00 OFF 36 exposures

I
$2.00 OFF 24 exposures
I $1.00 OFF 12 exposures

r

0% off on posters I

(Greet for Annivereeriee & Bar Iiltzvahs)

I

31/2 x 5 or 4x6
I No Restrictions on Processing Time!

L

or 2nd set of prints free. c-41 process only
Not good with any other offer

We transfer your old movies, prints & slides to video cassette.

FULL PHOTO SERVICES INCLUDING: BLACK & WHITE, ENLARGEMENT, POSTERS
29215 Northwestern Hwy. at 12 Mile Rd. in Franklin Shopping Plaza

MC0110

1

• Submit a grade
transcript
• Must be Jewish from
the Metro Detroit Area
• Attending a college or
university
• Have ONE FULL
YEAR of credits towards
a degree (sophomore or
above)
• Have superior
scholarship
• Demonstrate NEED
for financial assistance
• Show leadership
qualities for future
benefit of the Detroit
Jewish Community
• Campus participation
and community activity
showing established roots

TYPED INFORMATION MUST BE
RECEIVED BY MAY 3, 1993
For further info: 827-1919

Mail to:

HAROLD J. SAMUELS,

Chairman
Scholarship Committee
26240 Inkster Road
Southfield, MI
48034-2243

Mi

The Real Impact

Of Faisal al-Husseini

Israel's decision to negotiate directly with the
east Jerusalem Arab leader, will have a
major impact on the PLO.

DOUGLAS DAVIS FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT

srael's decision to end the
procedural fiction that so far
has prevented "unofficial"
Palestinian delegation leader
and east Jerusalem resident
Faisal al-Husseini, from taking
his place at the negotiating
table is likely to have far-reach-
ing implications both for the
peace process and for Palestin-
ian politics.
The move represents anoth-
er break by Yitzhak Rabin's La-
bor government with the
hard-nosed dogma of its Likud
predecessor, which feared that
allowing Palestinian residents
of Jerusalem at the negotiating
table would undermine Israel's
claim to unfettered sovereign-
ty over an undivided Jerusalem.
The Likud reservations were
dismissed as "ridiculous" by
Foreign Minister Shimon Peres,
who has met Mr. Husseini sev-
eral times in recent weeks and
who conceded in an Israel Ra-
dio interview that "in practice,
he heads the delegation. He is
invited to Washington. The
United States talks to him. We
are not deaf and blind. This is
the reality and it is not hard to
bear."
Israel's concession appeared
to be sufficient to convince the
Palestinians to drop their long-
standing precondition for the
396 Hamas deportees to be al-
lowed home before they came
to the peace talks in Washing-
ton, scheduled to resume next
week.
Mr. Husseini is the 53-year-
old scion of a family that mo-
bilized Arab resistance to the
pre-state Zionist movement and
produced both its religious and
military leaders: the Mufti of
Jerusalem, Haj Amin el-Hus-
seini, and Abdel-Khader Hus-
seini, hero of the war against
the nascent Jewish state who
was killed in the battle for the
Kastel on the highway between
Jerusalem and Tel Aviv.
Mr. Husseini's impeccable
Palestinian credentials were en-
hanced by his arrest almost im-
mediately after Israeli troops
swept through Jerusalem in the
1967 Six-Day War, by periods
of house arrest between 1982 to
1987 and by bouts of adminis-
trative detention since then.
But his elevation to the high
table at the peace talks will be
more than a mere symbolic con-
cession. It will significantly up-
grade the credibility of the

I

Palestinian delegation — and
it will present the PLO leader- '
ship in faraway Tunis with
acute dilemma.
While Mr. Husseini is wide-
ly acknowledged to be the most ,
senior PLO representative in \
the territories and while he rit-
ually swears allegiance to the
PLO, his new prominence will ,
inevitably strengthen the "in- -`
ternal" Palestinians at the ex-
pense of the "external" PLO,
who have a different con- _
stituency and, in some impor-
tant respects, a different
agenda.
The Palestinian intifada,
which erupted in December
1987, was a decisive turning
point in Palestinian history, a
moment when the Palestinians
under occupation finally de-
spaired of the hollow rhetoric
from Tunis and took their col-
lective destiny into their own
hands.
Above all, it shifted the Pales-
tinian balance of power from
Tunis to the territories, a move
that was accelerated by the cat-
astrophe that PLO Chairman
Yassir . Arafat visited on the
Palestinians by his endorse-
ment of Iraq's Saddam Hussein.
To Palestinian nationalists

Likud reservations
were dismissed by
Mr. Peres.

in the territories, Chairman
Arafat remains "Mister Pales-
tine," a potent symbol of the
Palestinian cause. However,
Chairman Arafat is locked in a
time-warp and, to the young
movers and shakers of the '90s,
his '60s-style revolutionary
rhetoric has become an irritat-
ing irrelevance.
The "externals" are increas-
ingly perceived as representing
the interests of past generations
— Palestinian refugees who fled
into exile following the 1948 and
1967 wars — and their agenda
is dominated by the "right to re-
turn," an issue that is regarded
across Israel's political spec-
trum as a non-starter.
While paying lip-service to
their refugee brethren, the
agenda of the "internals" has
been sharply honed by the re-
HUSSEINI page 104

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