100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

April 02, 1993 - Image 90

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-04-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Stephen Becharas . . . and The Staff Of

Zubin Mehta:
Israel's Mr. Music

6638 Telegraph Road at Maple

In The Bloomfield Plaza

851-0313

A VERY
HAPPY PASSOVER

We thank you for your
gracious patronage . . . and
most sincerely
wish the very best
in health, joy and
prosperity to all

Shirlee Bloom

And Staff ... Wish Their Customers and Friends
A Very Happy, Prosperous & Healthy

Passover

SHIRLEE BLOOM

WILL BE OPEN DURING THE WEEK OF PASSOVER
FOR ALL YOUR TRADITIONAL PASSOVER FOODS

6 6 6

I

6 6 6

I I III I I ■
OEM= • • • MI=

0 0 0 0000

Vineyards
Will Serve
Traditional Fried Matzoh
and
Matzo Sandwiches
For Your Passover Dining Pleasure

32418 Northwestern Hwy., Bet. 13 & 14 Mile

90

MICHAEL ELKIN SPECIAL TO THE JEWISH NEWS

t was conduct becoming a
caring and legendary
conductor as well as an
Israeli booster.
In the midst of the Persian
Gulf War, conductor Zubin
Mehta charateristically
helped lead the way, offering
comfort to shell-shocked
Israelis as Tel Aviv took hits
from Saddam Hussein's
Scud missiles.
"I have always been a
friend of Israel," says the
conductor of the Israel
Philharmonic Orchestra.
For many music-lovers,
Mr. Mehta stands alone as a
symbol of international sup-
port for Israel's cultural
arts.
The Bombay-born conduc-
tor has been associated with
the IPO since 1961; he
became music director for
life in 1983. And his life has
been inextricably intert-
wined with the recent for-
tunes of the orchestra, whose
roots go back some 60 years,
to when it was known as the
Palestine Orchestra.
In his more than 30 years
at its helm, Mr. Mehta has
made the musical ensemble
into a symphonic star, or-
chestrating brilliant pro-
grams and ambitious tours.
The IPO has been in good
hands during the Mehta era;
but then, the conductor says
he has to hand it to Israelis
for putting so much of their
heart and soul into music.
"Music," says Zubin
Mehta, "has always been
important in the Jewish way
of life. The Jewish people
brought it with them when
they came from the ghettos
of Europe to other parts of
the world."
It was as much a part of
their baggage as the pain
and suffering they endured
as victims of prejudice and
bias, he says.
But in music, notes Mr.
Mehta, Jews found solace
and sustenance, the sounds
of fury and fighting finding a
soulful manifestation.
A citizen of the world —
Mr. Mehta's well-worn pass-
port is a symphony of stamps
— the conductor has found a
home-away-from home in
Israel, where music is a
mania among sabras and

I

Sincerely Wishes It's Many
Friends And Customers

Ron Asmar

Entertainment

855-9463

Advertising in The Jewish News Gets Results
Place Your Ad Today. Call 354-6060

Michael Elkin is the enter-

tainment editor of the Jewish
Exponent in Philadelphia

Zubin Mehta

new settlers who find peace
and harmony in IPO con-
certs.
"For a small country, we
have 36,000 subscribers —
possibly the largest concen-
t at i o n of music lovers
anywhere," says Zubin
Mehta with pride.
And almost nothing can
keep Israelis from their
music. "During the Yom
Kippur War, we did two con-
certs a day, and people came.
The auditorium was pack-
ed," he says.
Yet, with bombs bursting
in air, instruments were
muted, says Mr. Mehta, dur-
ing the Persian Gulf War in
1991. "That was one time
when the music stopped."
Today, the Judean hills
continue to be alive with the
sound of music under Mr.
Mehta — and beyond. In the
role of cultural ambassador,
the IPO has attracted SRO
audiences in countries
worldwide, with tours to
Japan, Argentina, Poland,
Hungary and the former
Soviet Union.
"We could never do such
tours without the aid of the
American Friends of the or-
chestra," says Mr. Mehta.
But excellence comes with
a price. Without government
subsidy, the IPO must rely
on contributions within and
outside the country as well
as ticket sales. "Every musi-
cian costs $50,000 a year,"
says Mr. Mehta, noting that
such a salary "is cheap com-
pared to American musi-
cians."
Of course, in a country

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan