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April 02, 1993 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-04-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

A CHARITABLE DONATION
THAT PAYS YOU BACK.



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CAMPUS LIFE page 15

mation and ammunition to
fight back.
Aimed at high school
juniors and seniors,
College Fair afforded stu-
dents the opportunity to
watch conflict in action,
listen to a panel discussion
and speak individually
with student representa-
tives from eight colleges
ranging from the
University of Michigan to
Northern Michigan
University.
"These high school stu-
dents seem to be seriously
thinking about what they'll
be facing in college," Mr.
Wallach said.
"Talk To Us," a group of
10 U-M students perform-
ing interactive skits, got
the discussion rolling. The
troupe acted out three rou-
tines.
In the first act, two girls
from Jackson get a third

roommate who is Jewish.
The gentile girls do not
make life easy for their
roommate.
The second skit consist-
ed of a group of blacks and
whites talking about Black
History Month. The ques-
tion: how to approach
someone of a different race
or ethnicity to learn more
about his background.
The third act was troupe
members on stage yelling
out words and ethnic slurs,
then asking the audience
how they felt when they
heard the language.
"I think the performance
raised awareness of prob-
lems these kids will be
dealing with and got them
to talk about it," Mr.
Wallach said.
During the panel discus-
sion, issues of support by
faculty members and the
institutions were raised. ❑

Welcome Book Eases
Resettlement Process

RUTH LITTMANN STAFF WRITER

GIVE TO "FURNITURE FOR FAMILIES"
AND EARN 15% OFF ANY WORKBENCH ITEM.

From April 1-19, The Salvation Army and Workbench Furniture are
co-sponsoring "Furniture For Families" - a special three-week drive
to collect used furniture for needy families.

To make a furniture donation, call The Salvation Army at
(313)965-7760 in Metro Detroit, and for Grand Rapids and
surrounding areas, call (616)452-3133, to arrange for a pick up.

By participating, you can earn 15% off any Workbench item.
All items are tax deductable, and will be picked up from your home
or business by The Salvation Army.

TH E DETRO IT JEW ISH NEWS

The 15% discount is good at all Michigan Workbench locations,
in Southfield, Birmingham, Ann Arbor, and Grand Rapids.
Call 1-800-486-5930 for details.

Furniture Designed For Homes,
Not Museums.

T

ry to imagine things
in reverse. Instead of
Russians resettling in
Detroit, let's say
Detroiters were moving, en
masse, to Moscow.
Think of all the simple
tasks bound to pose prob-
lems: signing checks in
Cyrillic, addressing enve-
lopes, dialing the Russian
version of 911.
A new guidebook, pub-
lished by two local Jewish
women's groups, eases
acculturation for Russian
refugees by explaining
facets of American life that
most natives take for
granted.
Welcome to Jewish
Detroit: A bilingual hand-
book for new Americans
explains everything from
how to use public trans-
portation to the importance
of deodorant.
The National Council of
Jewish Women and
Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of
Metropolitan Detroit pub-
lished the 167-page book,
which will be distributed
primarily to refugees as
they arrive in Michigan
through the Resettlement
Service. Refugees who have
been here a bit longer also
will have access to the pub-
lication.
"When people first come
to Detroit and go through
Resettlement, they are
given so much information

at one time they can't pos-
sibly comprehend it all,"
said Rosie Schlussel, who
helped with the book. "We
figured if they had a guide
to refer back to, it would be
a lot easier."
The project, chaired by
Frieda Langnas, was
spearheaded two years ago.
NCJW and Women's
Division plan to publish
more than 500 copies.
Each page of English is
juxtaposed with a version
in Russian. In addition to
annotating lists of recre-
ational spots and health-
care facilities, the writers
have included descriptions
of Jewish agencies and a
directory of area temples
and synagogues.
Also included are chap-
ters on education, laws and
regulations and shopping.
Some advice in the book
may seem helpful, but
touchy. For example:
"Dental floss is waxed or
unwaxed string that is
used to remove bits of food
that become lodged
between the teeth. It helps
prevent gum disease, cavi-
ties and bad breath."
Writers went to great
pains to sensitize them-
selves to cultural differ-
ences:
"Don't be surprised if
you see many left-handed
people. American schools
do not prohibit the use of
the left hand for writing."



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