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March 26, 1993 - Image 73

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-03-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Vabt
'Dvd
• vq.
Nolo
Patiently Waiting For The Gevins

By MARY KORETZ

I vays nit what the original purpose
was for having the search of the
afikomen at the very sof of the seder
meal. Whatever the maynung, it
serves a useful function heint.
Because of it, the children muzn
vachtn for the conclusion of the meal
ayder they are allowed to hunt for the
gevins. Thus, they experience
delayed gratification.
We hobn developed a tendency, in
recent years to grant a child's farlang
immediately for a desired item. It is
oft with the best of intentions and the
poorest tachles that we do so. Instant
gratification nemt tsu fun the child of
developing a number of skills, naytik
to live a useful and joyful existence.
The basic skills necessary, in
making our veg durch life, are not a
result of instant gratification. There is
no such zach as instant layenen
shreibn or aritmetik. Physical
achieverrients, azoy vie swimming
and bicycling, are time consuming.
The kunstn, a musical and visual, are
both time-demanding. To oplaykenen
a child of this naytik time for
accomplishment is baganvenen
him/her of the great joy of mastering
a subject.
I remember the - tog that I realized
that I had mastered the alef-bayz. I
remember sitting in the first seat, of
the third raye, of the shule-tsimer
when I became aware that I could
read anything printed in the English
shprach. I did not recognize the
bateit of all the verter that I read, but
I had mastered the technik of
reading. The feeling of excitement
was overwhelming. I hob gefilt as
though I was catapulted into a new
velt, bright and adventurous.
I also dermon zich of the first time
I became cognizant of the farshidine
roles the hent of a zayger played, in
indicating time. The lerer had hot
derklert it to the class on two or three
different occasions. I kept looking at
the clock tsu probirn to farshtayn
why, when the big hand was one the
nine and small on the 12 it was a fertl
to 12 but it was also three quarters
after elf. At some point the plonter
gave way to clarity. The
concentration and searching paid off.
To this day, I do not have a digital
clock or wear a digital hant zaygerl.
The feeling persists that there is a
remembered frayd, of mastering the
bagrif of telling time by derkenen the
meaning of the hands.
It's nice that, at least, at Passover
the kinder can experience the
excietment of delayed gratification.

VOCABULARY

vays

know

not
end

nit

sof
maynung

meaning
today
must
wait
before
prize
have
request
often
result
deprives
necessary
way
through

heint
muzn
vachtn
ayder
gevins
hobn
farlang
oft
tachles
nemt tsu fun
naytik
veg
durch

zach
layenen
shreibn
aritmetik
azoy vie
kunstn -
oplaykenen
baganvenen
tog
alef-bayz
raye
shult-tsimer
sphrach
bateit
verter
technik
hob gefilt
velt
dermon zich

thing
reading
writing
arithmetic
such as
arts
deny
rob
day
alphabet
row
school room
language
meaning
'words
technique
felt
world
recollect

farshidine
hent
zayger
lerer
hot derklert
tsu probirn
farshtayn
fertl
elf
plonter
hant zaygerl
frayd
bagrif
derkenen
kinder

various
hands
clock
teacher
explained
to try
understand
quarter (one fourth)
eleven
confusion
wrist watch
joy
concept
recognizing
children

May Koretz of Oak Park has taught
both children's and adult classes in
Yiddishat Workmen's Circle.

NtootiA
6u:° Heavenly Cake Healthy Pesach Treat

By LESLYE MICHLIN BORDEN

VW'

Given the difficult food rules of
Passover, it isn't easy to come up
with many extra special recipes
worthy of the occasion. For me, the
difficulty has been compounded
ever since my husband I have
decided to follow a low-fat, low-
cholesterol diet. Since no rising
agents are allowed during
Passover, Jewish bakers have
relied on eggs to lighten many
Passover delicacies. Most Passover
sponge cakes use 12 whole eggs,
and they are not the only foods that
do so.
I've been experimenting for a
while with the idea of baking a
Passover angel food cake. After a
few hilarious failures, I came up with
a cake that is really fabulous. It is
light, moist and flavorful and it
contains no fat or cholesterol.
The method I follow is similar to
what I used to do when I baked
regular Passover sponge cakes,
except I use 12 egg whites, instead
of whole eggs. Of course, I use
matzo cake meal for flour, orange
juice to keep it moist and parve, and
a little orange rind for flavoring.
Serve Passover strawberry
shortcake one night. Just split the
angel food cake, fill it with fresh
strawberries, and drizzle the top
with a glaze made of preserves and
sweet Passover wine. What a treat!

ANGEL FOOD CAKE

1 1/4 cups matzah cake meal
1 3/4 cups sugar
2 Tablespoon finely grated orange
peel (no white)

1 3/4 cups egg whites
/2 teaspoon salt
2 Tablespoons orange juice
Preheat oven to 325 degrees

1

Measure 1 cup sugar into a small
bowl. Combine the remaining 3/4 cup
of sugar with the matzah cake meal.
Add the orange peel and set aside.
In the large electric mixer bowl,
beat the egg whites and salt until
soft peaks form. Gradually add the 1
cup sugar, 1/4cup at a time,
alternately with the orange juice.
Beat well after each addition.
Continue beating until stiff peaks
form when the beaters are slowly
raised.
Using a rubber spatula or wire
whisk, fold in the matzah cake meal-
sugar-orange peel mixture, one
quarter at a time. Use 15 under-
and-over strokes for each addition,
turning the bowl a little after each
stroke. When all the matzah mixture
has been added, fold an additional
10 strokes.
Pour this batter into an
ungreased 10-inch tube pan. Bake
for 50 minutes to 1 hour, or until the
cake springs back to the touch.
Remove from the oven and
immediately invert the pan and let it
cool.
when ready to serve, use a sharp
knife to loosen the sides and center
of the cake from the pan. Turn out
to a serving plate.

Makes 20 slices.

Per serving: 136 calories; 3 grams
protein; 31 grams carbohydrate; 0.8
grams fat; 0 milligrams cholesterol. Less
than 1 percent of total calories come from
fat.

STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE

1 No-Cholesterol Passover Angel
Food Cake
2 baskets fresh strawberries,
washed and hulled
Strawberry Sauce
Bake the Angel Food Cake
according to directions. When it is
thoroughly cool, slice the cake in
half with a long knife. Place the
bottom half on the serving platter,
cut side up. Spoon half the
Strawberry Sauce and then cover
with half the strawberries, sliced.
Place the top half of the cake over
this. Drizzle it with the remaining
Strawberry Sauce. Garnish with the
rest of the strawberries, sliced or
whole.
Serves 20.

Per serving: 136 calories; 3 grams
protein; 31 grams carbohydrate; 0.14
grams fat; 0 milligrams cholesterol. Less
than 1 percent of total calories come from
fat.

STRAWBERRY SAUCE

/2 cup low-calorie Passover
strawberry preserves
1 /4 cup sweet red Passover wine
In a small saucepan, heat the
preserves. Add the wine. Cook until
the preserves melt and the mixture
is well combined.
Makes 3 /4 cup (10 Tablespoons).

1

Per Tablespoon: 14 calories; 0 grams
protein; 3 grams carbohydrate; 0 grams
fat; 0 milligrams cholesterol. No per cent
of total calories come from fat.

Leslye Michlin Borden is a former
Detroiter residing in California who
specializes in healthful kosher
cuisine.

CY,

Cr)

CO

CsJ

CC

73

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