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March 26, 1993 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-03-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Introducing
Ron Shinske From
Michigan State University

Project Chametz
Feeds Hungry

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D

it.

on't throw away the
canned cream of
mushroom this
Pesach.
Pioject Chametz needs

A joint effort between
the Jewish Community
Council and The Jewish
News, Project Chametz
helps feed metro Detroit's
hungry during Passover,
the Jewish celebration of
freedom.
It is also an opportunity
for Jews to rid their
homes of non-kosher-for-
Passover foods.
Non-perishable, un-
opened foods can be
dropped into boxes deco-
rated by students of
Darchei Torah and the
Jewish Community Cen-
ter nursery schools from
March 29 through April 4.
Foods do not have to be
kosher.
Drop-off sites- are the
Agency for Jewish Edu-

cation building in South-
field and both Jewish
Community Centers.
Last year, more than
1,000 pounds of food was
collected and issued to St.
Vincent De Paul and the
Food Bank of Oakland
County. Both organiza-
tions then distributed the
food to their various agen-
cies, including soup
kitchens and shelter.
"This is our fourth year \
and I think this project is
becoming better known,"
said Miriam Imerman,
domestic concerns director
for the JCCouncil. "Our
goal this year is to collect
as much food and feed as
many hungry people as
possible."
Ms. Imerman suggested
donors avoid foods sealed
in glass. In addition, con-
tributions should be rea-
sonable, but not too exotic.
Keep the pickled quail =
eggs at home. ❑

Un-Hot Volunteer
Spots Need Help

RUTH LITTMANN STAFF WRITER

D

esperate. That's the
way Elina Zilberberg
at Jewish Family
Service characterizes
the need for Jewish volun-
teers.
Take Mildred Snitz.
The 86-year-old resident
of Jewish Federation
Apartments lives alone.
She is blind and recover-
ing from hip surgery, and
her family lives out of
town.
"It gets to be pretty lone-
ly," Mrs. Snitz said.
The loneliness abated
somewhat when volun-
teers from the Friendly
Visitors and Shopper pro-
grams began frequenting
her home. They helped
Mrs. Snitz sort her mail,
write checks and shop for
groceries.
"I'd be lost without
them," she said.
The need for volunteers

is most critical in areas
that are no longer "hot,"
Mrs. Zilberberg said.
Visiting the elderly was
once a popular activity for
volunteers — so was shop-
ping for the homebound.
Recently, however, new
opportunities, especially
those serving Russian
refugees, have gained pop-
ularity. Although Jewish
agencies always need more
volunteer translators, con-
versational English tutors,
and other volunteers to
ease the transition for new
Americans, resettlement
programs are fairly well-
staffed, Mrs. Zilberberg
said.
However, the communi-
ty lacks volunteers for pro-
grams that have been
around for a while, like the
Friendly Visitor and
Shopper programs. These
are older, possibly less

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