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March 12, 1993 - Image 36

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Affording the best is not the
question...finding the best is.

A first ,
Apartment living in a
Skilled Nursing Facility

For the discriminating person
requiring an elegant environment

Bortz
Health Care

Family owned and operated for over 33 years
Medicare approved

CALL
363-4121

For our limousine to pick you up for a personal tour of our facility.

6470 Alden Drive, Orchard Lake

JEWELRY APPRAISALS

J At Very Reasonable Prices. Call For An Appointment

Vi
alltieftee

Lawrence M. Allan, Pres.

30400 Telegraph Road
Suite 134
Bingham Farms, Ml 48010
(313) 642-5575

AWARDED CERTIFICATE BY GIA
IN GRADING AND EVALUATION

DAILY 10-5:30
THURS. 10-7
SAT. 10-3

t•

established 1919

FINE JEWELERS

TH E D E TRO IT J E WIS H NE WS

GEM/DIAMOND SPECIALIST

30

wow
THEM WITH A BASKET

CALL: A TISKET A TASKET

CUSTOM GIFT BASKETS & GOURMET TRAYS

661-4789

is

7 Days a Week

Barbara Kaplan
Judi Shefman

HOSPITALITY,
NEW BABIES,
GET WELL,
SHIVA, ETC

When Clothes
Make The Difference,
We Make The Clothes.

Mon.-Fri. 10-4
Sat. 10-3

Franklin Plaza
358-4085
29107 Northwestern Hwy.
Southfield (2nd entrance from 12 Mlle In rear)

All Arbor

STRANGE BREW page 35

to perfect the alcohol end,
Ms. Kirscht will be work-
ing to refurbish the two
buildings that Grizzly
Peak will call home. It
appears to be the perfect
combination. Ms. Kirscht,
a medical bio-statistician,
always has wanted to ren-
ovate buildings and Mr.
Seifer has spent numerous
hours in the Anchor
Brewery in his native
California.
Connected on the first
level only, the future
Grizzly Peak buildings
were built in 1890 and
1901. The 1890 building
boasts an Italian look
while the newer building
is decidedly Chicago-loft
style.
Ms. Kirscht and Mr.
Seifer plan to renovate the
buildings true to their
past, decorating the space
with American arts and
crafts popular during the
late 1890s and early
1900s.
The real trick, Mr.
Seifer said, was develop-
ing the restaurant and bar
around the functional
requirements of getting
two kitchens and a brew-
ery into the vicinity.
The traditional 50-seat
bar, several tables and
brew kettles enclosed in
glass will sit on the main
floor. A dining room and
banquet room occupy the
second floor. A third-floor
loft space will be home to
a European furniture
dealer.
Grizzly Peak's libations
may be a bit of a shock to
the average American con-
sumer — this is not like
Budweiser. Instead, the
majority of Grizzly Peak's
brews will be naturally
conditioned and unfil-
tered.
"It tastes different. It's
a clear beer, holding all
the proteins from the ket-
tle," Mr. Seifer said. "It
also will be served warmer
than people are used to —
45 degrees. We don't want
people to equate this with
warm beer. But since the
brew is not filtered or car-
bonated, a colder tempera-
ture would make the drink
hazy."
Victor's Golden Ale will
be among the exceptions.
Mr. Seifer refers to the
low-alcohol, light ale as
the transition drink of
Grizzly Peak. It will be
served filtered and car-
bonated like domestic
beers, and unfiltered and
naturally conditioned.
"People can see and
taste the difference," Mr.
Seifer said. "I call it a

transition beer so if you
don't trust what we're
doing, you can start with
something similar to what
you can drink in any bar
(carbonated and filtered).
If you like it, try the natu-
rally conditioned variety
and go from there."
The naturally condi-
tioned beers, because they
are not carbonated, go
through a brew engine
rather than a keg tap. The
bartender literally pumps
out the ale.
For the more sophisti-
cated palate, Grizzly Peak
will offer Andeck's Altbier,
AJ's IPA (India Pale Ale)
and Pugsley Special
Porter. Puglsey was
named after a friend, AJ's
after Mr. Seifer and Ms.
Kirscht's black labrador
Amity Jane, and Andeck's
after a famous monastery-
brewery in Bavaria's
Black Forest.
"Andeck's is for folks
who are serious about

A third-floor loft
space will be
home to a
European
furniture dealer

their beer," Mr. Seifer
said.
Mr. Seifer and Ms.
Kirscht are confident Ann
Arbor is ready for their
style of serving up suds.
Mr. Seifer, a managing
consultant, researched his
market and found that 90
percent of regular brew-
pub customers nationwide
buy imports and micro-
brewery products in the
store. In Washtenaw
County, the sale of
imports and microbrewery
products is four to five
times higher than in any
other county in Michigan.
"This is the place to be,"
Mr. Seifer concluded.
Mr. Seifer and Ms.
Kirscht aren't looking to
open a brawl hall though.
"We don't want this to
be a place to get drunk,"
Mr. Seifer said. "Instead,
this is on the order of a
traditional beer hall, a
community gathering
spot. In Europe, these are
centers of public life.
People don't make a date
to go to the pub. They go

-

alone, meet up with peo-
ple and talk about
events." ❑

N

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