100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

March 05, 1993 - Image 95

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-03-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

A

0

I I

off
Abei-r

lycnotlo
o u pmicnail niswsuheic sh members of the communit y
insight

largest collections of record-
ings by Brazilian composer
Villa-Lobos.
Mr. Dworkin is a native
Detroiter, raised first in the
Dexter area then in North
Oak Park. Today, he lives in
Southfield. He attended
Wayne State University,
where for a short time he
was a member of the radical
Students for a Democratic
Society, and holds a doctor-
ate in economics from the
University of Michigan.
He opened his first busi-
ness in Ann Arbor, then 23
years ago founded Lincorp
Research Inc. in Southfield.
His partner, Jamal Shallal,
is Chaldean, a friend from
WSU. "I'm a registered in-
vestment adviser; he knows
math," Mr. Dworkin says.
"It's a complementary com-
bination."
Active in the Hebrew
Benevolent Society, Young
Israel of Southfield, Mizrachi
and the Jewish National
Fund, Mr. Dworkin is a
member of the American
Statistical Association, the
American Economic Associ-
ation and MENSA. He is
married to Terri, a teacher,
with whom he has three chil-
dren: Lauren, Wendy and
Geoffrey. He is the chairman
of the property assessment
board of review for the City
of Southfield.

WHAT CONCERNS YOU MOST
ABOUT THE STATE OF
CONTEMPORARY JEWRY?

You Gotta Have Faith

ELIZABETH APPLEBAUM

ASSISTANT EDITOR

GLENN TRIEST

PHOTOGRAPHY

wo sets of teeth sit in
Michael G. Dworkin's
office. The first rests
on a pair of feet. It's a
plastic toy that chat-
ters away when
wound up, part of a comput-

T

er promotion called Mega
Bite.
The second belongs to a
stuffed piranha. He'd bought
one for a friend who collect-
ed fish, then decided to get
one for himself, too.

Mr. Dworkin is an econo-
mist, a photographer, an avid
reader, a gardener and a
dassical music enthusiast. A
fan of everything from Vi-
valdi to Shostakovich, he
owns one of the world's

"I'm troubled by the alien-
ation of Jews from their
faith.
"Every problem — from a
lack of education to inter-
marriage — that the Jewish
leadership bemoans stems
from this loss of emunah,
faith.
"The observance of what
for millennia was presumed
to be the Jewish way of life
has come to be equated with
decisions like, What color
suit should I wear today?' or

0,
0,

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan