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February 12, 1993 - Image 96

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-02-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

VAN KAMPEN MERRITT INSURED INCOME TRUST

When we say
"The check is in the mail,"
we mean
it.
In
fact,
it's
insured.
For the investor seeking insured** income.
7.27 % *

The Van Kampen Merritt Insured Income Trust seeks to provide a high
level of current income consistent with capital preservation. And when
your earnings are due, they're paid—on time—never late. That's because
Estimated
the timely payment of principal and interest on each bond in the portfolio
Long-Term Return
is guaranteed.** Choose between monthly or semi-annual dividend pay-
ments, whichever is more convenient for your budget. All units of the
Trust come with Standard and Poor's highest possible rating, AAA**.

Order your free information kit today.

Call us for more about the Van Kampen Merritt Insured Income Trust. We'll rush you a prospectus containing
more complete information, including charges and expenses. Read it carefully before you invest or send money.

Van Kampen Merritt'

INVESTING WITH A SENSE OF DIRECTION ')

Romery & Co.

STEVEN C. LETZER

1-800-544-8754
(313) 540-3733

SIPC
Member New York Stock Exchange

344 N. Woodward
Suite 200
Birmingham, MI 48009

*The Estimated Long Term Return (ELTR) is calculated using a formula which (1) takes into consideration and determines
and factors in the relative weightings of, the market values, yields (which takes into account the amortization of
premiums and the accretion of discounts) and estimated retirements of all the bonds in the Trust and (2) takes into
account the expenses and sales charge associated with each Trust Unit as of 01/28/93. Series #26. There can be no
assurance ELTR will be realized in the future. The maximum sales charge for Trust Units is 4.9% of the public offering
price.

a The Insurance has been obtained from Capital Markets Assurance corporation and the terms of the insurance are more
fully described in the Trust prospectus; no representation is made as to the insurer's ability to meet its commitments and
the insurance relates only to the bonds in the Trust and not to the units offered. The insurance does not remove market
risk: the principal value and investment return of Trust units will vary with market conditions. Therefore, the
redemption value of Trust units may be more or less than the original values. The AAA rating is due to the insurance
policy and assigned to the units of the Trust. The U.S. Government guarantee applies to the applicable securities in the
Trust portfolio, not to the units of the Trust. denotes a trademark of Van Kampen Merritt

ATTENTION HOME BUYERS

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132

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BUSINESS

MODERN MEDICINE page B31

the business end of medi-
cine," Mr. Schaengold said.
"The key to remember is
physicians aren't going to
practice medicine any differ-
ently under a system where
they become an employee,"
Mr. Schaengold said. "The
question today is how much
of doctors' time is being wast-
ed on non-clinical activities."
Dr. Harvey Lefkowitz has
two private practices.
A podiatrist, Dr. Lefkowitz
opened his doors in Ferndale
in 1982 with only $7,500. He
lived at home, furnished the
office slowly and worked as
an associate for another doc-
tor about 12 hours each week.
One year later he opened a
second office in Milford and
became partners with Dr.
Isadore Steiner.
He plans to remain inde-
pendent.
"Without a doubt, every
physician gets caught up in
paperwork. But if you can at-
tract good staff and train
them well, they can handle
most of it," Dr. Lefkowitz
said. "Of course, there are
certain instances that only a
doctor can handle. When
those situations arise, the
physician has a personal in-
terest. In a large system, the
problem gets pushed around
and the client loses."
Dr. Lefkowitz remains
leery of systems like Sinai
and Ford offer — private prac-
titioners employed by the
hospital.
"It seems like a losing
proposition for the hospital.
The bureaucracy probably
cannot run the business as ef-
ficiently as the private office,"
Dr. Lefkowitz said. "A physi-
cian knows he is getting a
paycheck. Why should he
worry if the patient has pre-
sented the correct insurance
information or has the abili-
ty to pay. It becomes the hos-
pital's problem, not the
doctor's."
"Also, you have created one
more step in the transferring
of information. It's like the
telephone game. It increases
the chance of error," Dr.
Lefkowitz said.
Dr. Lefkowitz does ac-
knowledge the difficulty in
starting a private practice in
1993 — loans are difficult to
obtain, managed care pro-
grams are closed and the
available patient population
diminishes to independent
doctors. However, starting as
an associate or buying a
satellite practice are options.

"There always will be a
place for a private practice,"
Dr. Lefkowitz said.
Dr. David Beneson, also a
podiatrist and practicing in
Royal Oak, is more open to
the idea of hospital-owned
practice. However, he also
has chosen to remain inde-
pendent.
"Programs like Dr. Golden
Dental Centers are ahead of
themselves. They appear to
be the future, cutting every-
one's costs," Dr. Beneson
said.
Economics is part of Dr.
Beneson's business too. He
has computerized his office,
controlled employee hours
and shopped carefully for the
best prices on equipment. He
participates with most in-
,.

Time wasted on
non-clinical
activities.

surance programs but has
found health maintenance
programs difficult.
"A lot of these programs
tell patients what doctors
they must go to. However, pa-
tients see different physicians
each visit and may wait up to
six months to get an ap-
pointment," Dr. Beneson
said. "I've had clients cancel
because their insurance has
changed and their visits to
me are no longer covered.
Many of them come back and
pay out of their pockets. They
may not have the money for
an operation, so we do what
we can to keep them com-
fortable. It's what we do." 0

Indian Food
Rivals Falafel

CAROL NOVIS

SPECIAL TO THE JEWISH NEWS

he recent opeing in
Jerusalem's Hilton
Hotel of the kosher
Indian restaurant
"Kobinoor," signified not on-
ly the continued popularity of
Indian food in a country bet-
ter known for falafel, but the
personal success of Reena and
Vinod Pushkarna, the pro-
prietors of a popular chain of
Indian restaurants in Israel.
Among the most prominent
and successful members of
Israel's 40,000 strong Indian
community, the Pushkarnas
claim that Israel's business
climate can be profitable if
you're ready to work hard.
"There's a lot Israel can offer

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