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February 12, 1993 - Image 92

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-02-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

A BENTLEYYOU CAN
OWN BEFORE YOU'RE

BUSINESS

RICH AND FAMOUS.

XIV,: Or

S

,

r t

S 7

Introducing a motor car that gives you Bentley power and prestige for a surprisingly
affordable price, $138,500*. Bentley presents the Brooklands, the ultimate union of
advanced technology and the craftsman's 'skill.

BEN T L E Y

The Akatsi State Farm in Ghana is running in cooperation with a team of Israel
agriculturists.

BENTLEY • ROLLS ROYCE

MICHIGAN'S EXCLUSIVE BENTLEY ROLLS ROYCE DEALER
40475 ANN ARBOR RD., PLYMOUTH, MICHIGAN
(313) 453-7500 LOTTERY WINNER SPECIALS

© Rolls-Royce Motor Cars Inc., 1992. The name "Brooklands" is a trademark, and the name "Bentley" and the badge and
radiator grille are registered trademarks. *Manufacturer's suggested retail price. Taxes, title and registration fees additional.

Beautify And Protect Your Marble And Stone

THE DETRO IT JEWISH NEWS

RADISSON ON THE LAKE

8

Bring your marble and stone back to life by using Union Carbide MARBLE
LIFE technologies which include stripping of waxes and chemicals, lip-
page removal, scratch, scar and stain removal, crack and chip repair and
leaving a luxurious slip-resistant finish.

Advertising in The Jewish News Gets Results
Place Your Ad Today. Call 354-6060

Cooperative Aid
Makes Friends

YITZCHAK DINUR SPECIAL TO THE JEWISH NEWS

I

srael has participated in
projects of development
and assistance abroad
almost from the time of its
creation as an independent
state. Its chief motivation has
been the desire to participate
as fully as possible in what it
considers to be one of the
most promising and challeng-
ing fields of international
relations — cooperation in
development.
Israel's motivation is much
more basic than a simple con-
cern with the economic, the
political and the social
spheres. It has very much to
do with a modern and prac-
tical application of a time-
honored, still-cherished belief
in the initial and ultimate
brotherhood of man. When
searching its collective soul
prior to each Independence
Day, reflecting on its actions
and endeavoring to decide
what had been done badly
and what well, one area of
endeavor that Israel can be
consistently proud of is its
programs of assistance to
other developing nations.
Israeli aid to other coun-
tries at first was not at
Israel's initiative at all, but
developed in response to in-
terest originating from other
newly independent nations,
or from national in-
dependence movements. In-
deed, only in early 1958 was
a special Division for Interna-
tional Cooperation establish-
ed within the Ministry for
Foreign Affairs.
The earliest evidence of in-
terest in Israel's developmen-
tal successes came from a
Burmese delegation to the In-

ternational Trade Union Con-
gress in Belgrade in 1950.
The second was from Ghana,
which achieved its in-
dependence in 1957.
In 1968, Golda Meir, then
foreign minister, made her
first visit to Africa. She was
deeply moved by the enor-
mous challenges and pro-
blems facing the young
African states following their
independence and insisted
that Israel had a duty to help
fight these nations' grave pro-
blems of health, unemploy-
ment, education, housing and
malnutrition. Israel's pro-

Israeli aid to
other countries
at first was not
at Israel's
initiative at all.

gram of technical cooperation
was both spontaneous and
altruistic. Said Mrs. Meir,
simply, upon her return,
"They (the African states) are
in great need and we must
assist them." The empathy
and concern she expressed
then still govern Israel's con-
duct in this area of interna-
tional relations today.
Dr. Shimon Amir, former
long-time head of the Israel
Foreign Office's Division for
International Cooperation,
tells us that "The reason for
this mutual awareness of
shared problems and objec-
tives between Israel and
other developing nations are

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