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February 12, 1993 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-02-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

News

The Social Action Committee Council,
In Cooperation With Resettlement Service
Announces:

Disappointment Over
Selections For State

The Helping Hand Drive
For New Arrivals

Can you imagine trying to pack your life into two suitcases?
Russian families arrive in our community with 2 pieces of luggage per person.

You can help provide our new Americans with basic living needs —
join the Social Action Committee of your synagogue or temple.

From September through June, the Helping Hand Drive For New
Arrivals will be collecting items for the new Americans. To make it
even easier for you to help, each participating synagogue and temple
will be a collection point for donated items.

January-February

Donation Needs:
Bedspreads and Blankets

(Gently Used)

EXTEND YOUR HELPING HAND To OUR NEW AMERICANSI

For drop-off point locations, call

642-5393

PARTICIPATING CONGREGATIONS

Adat Shalom Synagogue, Birmingham Temple, Congregation Beit Kodesh,
Congregation Beth Abraham Hillel Moses, Congregation Beth Achim,
Congregation Beth Isaac, Congregation Beth Shalom, Congregation B'nai David,
Congregation B'nal Moshe, Congregation Shaarey Zedek, Congregation Shir
Tikvah, Congregation T'Chiyah, Temple Beth El, Temple Emanu•El, Temple Israel
Temple KW Ami, Temple Shir Shalom

RELIABLE AND EXPERIENCED SINCE 1930

insurance estimates accepted

expert color match, foreign & American

TOWING & RENTAL CARS AVAILABLE

La Salle Body Shop Inc.

28829

Orchard Lake Road, Farmington Hills, MI 48334
BETWEEN 12 & 13 Mile Rd.

MAX FLEISCHER, FOUNDER

STATE FARM INSURANCE

MARILYN J. GOLD-AGENCY

"I believe in personalized service"

• AUTO • HEALTH
• HOME • COMMERCIAL
• LIFE • IRAs • BUSINESS

32

353.1400

26561 W. 12 Mile Road, Suite 203, Southfield, MI 48034

553-7111

Send Someone
Special A Gift
52 Weeks a Year.

Send a gift
subscription to

THE

JEWISH NEWS

JAMES D. BESSER WASHINGTON CO RRESPONDENT

T

here was little
celebrating in pro-
Israel circles as the
Clinton transition
team rounded out its top-
level State Department ap-
pointments.
As expected, Peter Tarnoff
was named undersecretary
for political affairs, the
third-ranking post at State.
Pro-Israel activists who
were uneasy about the ap-
pointment of Warren M.
Christopher as secretary and
Clifton R. Wharton Jr. as his
deputy had hoped the post
would go to somebody closely
associated with the pro-
Israel cause. Mr. Tarnoff
lacks those connections. And
his role as a top aide to
former Secretary of State
Cyrus Vance during the
Carter administration is an-
other black eye in the minds
of some pro-Israel activists,
and Jewish neo-
conservatives in particular,
who viewed President
Jimmy Carter as lukewarm
toward Israel.
"We were very definitely
frozen out," said a Jewish
conservative who supported
Mr. Clinton. "This com-
pletes a State Department
team that looks very much
like a rerun of the Carter
years. Many of us are very
disappointed."
But there was muted satis-
faction at the appointment of
retired foreign service pro-
fessional Samuel W. Lewis
as director of policy plann-
ing.
Mr. Lewis, who served 31
years in the foreign service
and eight as ambassador to
Israel, has become a strong
pro-Israel voice in his cur-
rent role as president of the
U.S. Institute of Peace. But
it is unclear exactly how
much of a role the policy
planning job will play in the
Clinton government.
The former occupant of the
job, Dennis Ross, was close
to both the pro-Israel com-
munity and to ex-Secretary
of State James Baker. The
result was that the policy
planning division played an
unusually prominent role in
foreign affairs, particularly
in the Mideast peace talks.
"It is not clear how much
power policy planning will
have under Christopher,"
said Jess Hordes, Washing-
ton director for the Anti-
Defamation League. "It

would be unfortunate if Sam
Lewis, who is a seasoned
hand with considerable ex-
perience in the Mideast,
peace process, is not given dg
major role."
There was also satisfaction
in the pro-Israel world that
Edward P. Djerejian, the
assistant secretary for Near
East and South Asian Af-
fairs, was retained from the-
Bush administration. Since
his appointment in 1991,
Mr. Djerejian, a former am-
bassador to Syria and a
State Department profes-
sional, has won high marks
for his fair handling of the4
Mideast peace talks.
Pro-Israel groups had urg-
ed the Clinton transition
team to retain Mr. Djerejian
as a way of providing con-
tinuity in the peace talks. ❑

Accused Nazi
Guard Dies

New York (JTA) — Sergis
Hutyrczyk, a Somerset, N.J.,
man whose U.S. citizenship
was revoked for lying about
his wartime activities, died
last week of natural causes. ,
Mr. Hutyrczyk, who was
68, had been suffering from
an inoperable aneurysm in
his chest.
He died at home, only one
day after his lawyers filed on -
appeal on his behalf in the
U.S. Court of Appeals in
Philadelphia against the
order that revoked his
citizenship.
The Justice Department's
Office of Special Investiga-
tions first brought charges
against him in August 1990.
OSI had intended to pur-
sue deportation orders
against Mr. Hutyrczyk if his
appeals had failed.
Mr. Hutyrczyk, who im-
migrated to the United
States in 1954, lost his 4
citizenship last October bas-
ed on his admission that he
had served as an armed
guard at the Koldyczewo
concentration camp in .4
Byelorussia, now Belarus,
during World War II.
Mr. Hutyrczyk, a native of
Baranowice, Byelorussia,
denied he was personally
responsible for any killings.
However, the government
charged that he was known
as the "black commander"
in the concentration camp.



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