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January 29, 1993 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-01-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

YINGLISH page 7

PEOPLE ARE
POSITIVE ABOUT
FRANKLIN BANK.

They're very friendly and
convenient for me. They're
open Saturdays. . . 9 9

Franklin Bank continues to win friends,
with features people tell us are important
to them. Like caring financial professionals
who take the time to understand your
needs. Banking hours that work with your
schedule. And commercial checking with
the lowest fees in metropolitan Detroit.

JOE MACHIORLATII
Mr. Joe's Bar
Southfield

hot? — she had skimmed off
the ployka.
Over the years I have
learned that most people who
grew up with Yiddish and/or
Hebrew spoken around the
house, encountered some lan-
guage confusions along the
way. A woman I met last
summer at a Jewish confer-
ence confided that, as a child,
she wondered why everyone's
deceased grandfather was
named Oliver Shalom, as in
the reference "awlawv ha-
shalom," or rest in peace.
Then there was a class-
mate of mine who, as a
youngster, thought that the
Jewish mourning process in-
volved languishing in the
cold, as in "sit and shiver," in-
stead of sitting shivah.
(I know, I know, these
phrases lose a lot in transla-
tion.)

As for me, when I was a
kid I was jealous of a cousin
of mine who, I thought, had
a ritual blessing named after
her. Not only that, it was the
best-known bracha of all, the
one on bread, which con-
cludes, or so I heard it, "ha-

motzee lechem Minna
Horowitz."
The sad fact is that Yid-
dish, the universal Jewish
language, is heard less and
less with each passing gen-
eration. I see it in my own
family where my older broth-
er speaks Yiddish far better
than I do. I understand it but
feel awkward speaking, and
my kids know only some col-
orful expressions.
I always promise myself
that I'm going to take a
course in Yiddish, but so far
I just can't seem to fargin my-
self the time.



When you're a small business or practice,
you appreciate the importance of personal
service and attention to customer needs.
So do we.

Come in or call today to be a part of the
good things happening at Franklin Bank.

The New Thinking In Banking For Business.

Franklin
Bank

N.A.

358-5170

FDIC INSURED

Southfield • Birmingham • Grosse Pointe Woods

GRAND OPENING

w

U")

I

Over 8,000 sq ft of
Ceramic Tile • Marble • Granite
Whirlpool Tabs
Faucets • Bath Accessories
And Much More!

Update your kitchen with a
granite countertop

LLJ

"a totally new display concept for ceramic tile, marble and granite"

CC
1---
LLJ

LLJ

F-

8

CERAMIC TILE SALES

TJ Marble and Granite Shop

23455 Telegraph Road north of 9 Mile in Southfield
Phone 313-356-6430

Garbage Won't Help
Local Jewish Needy

RUTH LITTMAN STAFF WRITER

OF OUR NEW SHOWROOM

Cr)

Some recent donations at the Resettlement warehouse.

Hours:
Mon., Tues. and Thurs. 8:30-5
Wed. and Fri. 8:30-8
Sat. 9-5

he Resettlement
Service Warehouse
at Northland Shop-
ping Center is filled
with valuable household
goods like mattresses,
flatware and cribs. But it
also contains stuff barely
fit for dumpsters: stained
pillows, broken appli-
ances, dirty plates.
Many of the items
donated prove useless for
refugees who come to
America with nothing but
a suitcase. What they
really need are beds,
dinette sets, small couch-
es and dressers. Table
settings and cabinets also
are in demand.
The warehouse cannot
accept liquid, powders,
medical supplies, clothing
and appliances.

After a Jewish News
editorial last year criti-
cized those who gave un-
usable donations, the sit-
uation improved briefly.
Then it deteriorated, said
Elina Zilberberg, program
manager.
The Resettlement Serv-
ice has since appealed to
local congregations to
help collect quality new
and used items. A few
congregations serve as
pick-up points for small
donations like towels,
bedding and pillows. The
Resettlement Service
aims to include more syn- -\
agogues and to pick up items
regularly.
To donate or volunteer
at the Resettlement ware-
call 559-1500 or
559-4566. ❑

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