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January 08, 1993 - Image 122

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-01-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Violence Impacts
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1

Berlin (JTA) — German offi-
cials are said to be deeply
concerned about the dev-
astating impact the wave of
neo- Nazi violence here is
having on the country's
image in the eyes of Jews
around the world.
Government officials are
reported to be alarmed at a
series of protests against the
violence that were staged by
Jews in recent weeks outside
German consulates or em-
bassies in several countries,
including Australia, Brazil,
Britain and Israel.
The protests come after
years of attempts by the
government to convince
Jews around the world to
soften their attitudes toward
Germany. But many of those
advances have been dashed
by the spate of attacks
against foreigners and Jew-
ish memorials to the Holo-
caust.
In one of the latest violent
incidents, neo-Nazis in
western Germany severely
beat a Greek girl on Satur-
day and carved a swastika
into her forehead.
The incident followed two
earlier attacks by vandals on
the Greek school in Wupper-
tal, northeast of Dusseldorf,
where neo- Nazis threatened
students and told them to
stop "exploiting" Germany.
The Greek community in
Wuppertal demanded im-
mediate action by the au-
thorities to curb the right-
wing violence.
Opposition to racism was
reflected in demonstrations
joined by almost half a mill-
ion Germans, news reports
said. Vigils to protest neo-
Nazi violence took place in
Stuttgart, Hanover,
Bremen, Saabrucken,
Dusseldorf and Tubingen.
In one attempt to curb the
growing wave of hate, a fed-
eral agency said it is con-
sidering a ban on 19 publica-
tions targeted at young peo-
ple that propagate hatred
against foreigners and Jews.
The Mainz-based agency
said the increasing virulence
of the material, often ap-
pearing in entertainment
magazines, now made it
possible the courts would ac-
cede to such a ban.
Actions such as this and
the banning of various neo-
Nazi groups show that the
authorities are now taking
the problem of neo-Nazism
and anti-Semitism more se-
riously, after a slow start,

■ 4

according to one German
Jewish leader.
Ignatz Bubis, chairman of
the Central Council of Jew's'
in Germany, also raised .4
strong objections to sugges-
tions made by Jewish group
to boycott Germany because
of the neo-Nazi violence.
"Hitler isn't there. Ger-
many is not burning,"
said.
Mr. Bubis also said that
reports of a mass exodus of,
Jews from Germany are
greatly exaggerated. The
number of Jews who have
left for Israel have increased-1
only minimally, he said,
"and many of these are -
former Israelis."
At the same time, Mr 74
Bubis said that nearly 80
Jewish cemeteries and
memorials were desecrated•
this year and his hate mail is
both increasing and more I
open.
"The anonymous letters I -4
used to get now arrive with a
complete return address."

-4

Soccer Players
Fight Racism

Rome (JTA) — In attempt to
fight the phenomenon of an-
ti-Semitism at Europea
soccer games, Italian soccer
players staged demonstra-
tions against racism last
weekend before the openin
whistle of soccer matches all
across the country.
In crowded stadiums al
over Italy, soccer players
went into the pitch before
the game carrying big
banners reading, "No to
Racism."
The demonstrations were
carried out as an initiative of
the Italian Soccer Players
Association, in an attempt to
send the message to a broad
group of Italians, many of
whom have manifested wor-
risome prejudices.
Italy's soccer stadiums, as
those in other European
countries, have for some
time been the scene of dem-
onstrations in the stands by
militant fans who have
hurled anti-Semitic and
racist abuse at opponents
and who have waved neo-
Nazi-style banners.
Tullia Zevi, president of
the Union of Italian Jewish
Communities, took up the
issue several months ago
with soccer authorities.

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