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January 01, 1993 - Image 66

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-01-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FITNESS EALTI-1

Catzterbly

Are you concerned about
retirement housing and
healthcare for your
Parents? So are we.

Canterbury on-the-Lake understands your concerns. We are
creating a wonderful place for your parents which will include:

• Gracious independent and assisted
living apartments
• Five spacious floor plans
• Fine dining in an elegant setting
• Healthcare center on the campus
• Educational/social facilities
• State of the art security/fire alarm systems
• Park-like setting with nature trails
and water views

All for an affordable monthly fee
Call or visit Canterbury on-the-Lake marketing office today.

5601 Highland
Waterford, MI 48327

1-800-554-0613

OF SOUTHFIELD
4/ an early detection center

(.13

C4

CO

Call (313) 350•32 32

25811 w. 12 mile • suite 202 • southfield

RELAX
with

A variety of relaxation services under one roof

THE DE TRO I T J EWIS H NEWS

WE'RE FIGHTING FOR
YOUR LIFE

American Heart
Association

offering the most
accurate techniques for
detecting breast cancer
in its earliest stages

EXPERIENCE
Massage • Float • Light & Sound
•Classes • Sauna
January Promotion

Buy a one-hour massage & choose between a free float or light & sound

Expires 1-31-93

PARKER CLINIC

Therapeutic Relaxation Center

157. 5 Woodward
Suite 301
Bloomfield Hills

332-5756

FITNESS 1—f EALTH

FACTS & FADS

°tyke:Like

E-0

FITNESS EALTI-1

WE TAKE EXCEPTION
TO WHAT YOUR
MOTHER TAUGHT
YOU.

YOU SHOULDN'T EAT
EVERYTHING PUT IN
FRONT OF YOU.

You should avoid foods high in
cholesterol. It's a fact, a high
blood cholesterol level sub-
stantially increases your
chances of developing heart
disease. By cutting down on
fatty, rich foods, you can do
yourself a big favor. You could
lower your blood cholesterol
level and reduce your risk of
heart disease.
For more information about a
planned and balanced diet,
contact your American Heart
Association. We'll give you
some free advice on how to
plan a diet good for life.

Advertising in The Jewish News Gets Results
Place Your Ad Today. Call 354-6060

min users," says M s
Gridley.
According to Ms.
Gridley, 95 percent of
the study population who
took vitamin E also took
other vitamin supple-
ments. As a result, "we
cannot rule out that it is
a combination of the vit-
amins that is producing
the protective effect, par-
ticularly since vitamins
A, C and E are all anti-
oxidants, which are
known to help neutralize
carcinogenic effects.
However, we must also
consider that the
reduced risk could be
attributable to some hid-
den factor common to
users of vitamins, and
not to the vitamins per
se."
Ms. Gridley also found
that multivitamins con-
taining vitamins A, B, C
and E had no visible
effect on lowering cancer
risk. "We speculate that
the vitamin E dosage in
multivitamins (usually.
30 I.U.) was not suffi-
cient for a protective
effect," Ms. Gridley says.
Separate vitamin E
tablets sold over-the-
counter contain at least
100 I.U., which is 10
times the recommended
daily allowance.
Unless you're ready to
run out and buy mega-
doses of vitamin E, Ms.
Gridley offers a warning.
"This is just one study,"
she says. "We can't go
out on a limb yet." In
fact, she adds, two recent
studies in Boston show
vitamin E to safeguard
against heart disease.
"That's a better reason to
use it."
8. Can' you predict
rain because your joints
hurt? Does cold weather
give you a headache? Are
you depressed because
you haven't seen the sun
lately? If so, you're not
alone. Weather definitely
plays a significant role in
our general health and
sense of well-being.
Those are the findings
of Dr. Maria Simonson
and Dr. Joseph Fuhr-
maneck, co-directors of
the Health, Weight and
Stress Clinic at Johns
Hopkins Medical Institu-
tions.
"Weather itself may

II

not cause specific dis-
eases," says Dr. Simon-4
son, but it certainly can
weaken our immune sys-
tem, making us more
susceptible to a variety
of ailments and psycho-
logical conditions."
Did you know, for'4
example, that rainy
weather can cause anxi-
ety and mild depression 4
in approximately one-
half of the general popu-
lation? Or that 99 per-.4
cent of us are happier on
clear days?
And it's not just our ,
mood that suffers from
weather. When the baro-
metric pressure decreas-
es, the fluid level in our•I
body increases, causing
our tissues to swell,
which in turn reduces I

Weather
definitely plays
a significant role
in our general
health and sense
of well-being.

the blood flow to the -
brain. This can lead to a
slowing of our mental -I
process, a swing in our
blood sugar levels—par-
ticularly noticeable for 00
diabetics and hypo-
glycemics.
An increase in baro-
metric pressure can give
rise to fatigue, depres-
sion, inertia, sinusitis
and headaches, while
seasonal hot winds can
cause attacks of asthma,
arthritis and headaches.
What can we do to alle-
viate some of the poten-
tial health risks during .4
the next few months?
Drink plenty of water,
says Dr. Simonson, be-
cause water is a natural
diuretic and will help
ease the body's fluid lev-
els; exercise as much as -■
possible, within the lim-
its of your particular
medical conditions; and
always wear a hat since
we lose most of our body
heat through our heads. . 0
And if that doesn't
help, remember summer
will return. According to
Dr. Simonson, June is
the healthiest month of
the year. ❑

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