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January 01, 1993 - Image 54

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-01-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

EIGHT CONTROL

IT GOES BEYOND
WEIGHING AND MEA-
SURING. IT GOES BE-
YOND "DIETING." IT'S
HOW YOU LIVE YOUR
LIFE EVERY DAY!
SUZY RAN'S SCIENCE
OF SLIMMING IS MORE
THAN A PLACE TO LOSE
WEIGHT AND EXERCISE.
IT FITS INTO YOUR LIFE
EVERY DAY BECAUSE OF
OUR CONVENIENT EXER-
CISE SCHEDULE AND
THE PERSONAL ATTEN-
TION YOU GET. WHEN
YOU'RE READY TO MAKE
WEIGHT CONTROL A
PART OF YOUR LIFE-
STYLE, GIVE US A CALL.

Suzy Ran's

Li t.n:We

Science

of

sL

i V v
I
l\G

932-0300
IN ORCHARD MALL

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I T J EWIS H NEWS

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Children Are
Injury Prone

Injury has been called
"the last major plague of
the young." And for good
reason. Injuries are the
leading cause of death and
disability among children
and young adults in the
United States.
Each month, nearly 400
children under the age of
4 die from accidents, many
of which are preventable.
That's equal to nearly half
of the nation's monthly
death toll among small
children, according to the
American Academy of
Pediatrics. In fact, in-
juries from car and bike
accidents, falls, burns,
poisoning and other tragic
mishaps kill more young
Americans than all dis-
eases combined.
Injury also is the most
costly of all major health
problems in this country.
Its economic toll is nearly
$100 billion a year.
Despite these statistics,
much can be done to pre-
vent childhood injuries.
The best way to prevent
an accident is to antici-
pate it, so parents should
learn the most likely acci-
dent risks their children
face and how they can be
decreased, according to
Dr. Theodore Z. Polley Jr.,
a pediatric trauma spe-
cialist at the University of
Michigan Medical Center.
Among young children,
the majority of injury
deaths are the result of
bicycle and car accidents,
drowning and fire, while
pedestrian deaths are a
major problem in the
urban areas. The leading
cause of death among chil-
dren on bikes and in cars
is head injury, Dr. Polley
said.
Many of these deaths
could be prevented by the
proper use of bicycle hel-
mets and car safety seats.
Children who do not wear
helmets are seven times
more likely to suffer head
injuries and eight times
more likely to injure their
brain during an accident
than those who do.
Most bike accidents
stem from four errors,
false assumption and
risky behavior at intersec-
tions, turning without sig-
naling or checking traffic,
riding against the flow of
traffic, and failure to
check for traffic when rid-
ing in the street.

Drowning is also a
prevalent cause of acci-
dental death among chil-
dren, while diving acci-
dents account for a large
share of water-related
spinal cord injuries among
teen-agers and young
adults. Parents should
make sure their children
practice the following
water safety tips—and be
mindful of them them-
selves:
• Never leave a child
alone near open or frozen
bodies of water, no matter
how shallow.
• Inflatable toys and
mattresses should not be
used as life preservers, as
they can deflate and the
child can slip off.
• At poolside, keep
ropes and objects for
reaching and pulling a
child to safety within
quick reach.
• Always jump feet-first
on the first plunge.
• Never dive head-first
into 5 feet of water or less,
and never dive head-first
into an above-ground pool.
• Never dive head-first
from a dock or bridge,
since water levels can
vary greatly.
Accidental poisoning is
another source of child-
hood injury. As toddlers
begin to explore their
ever-expanding world,
they no doubt will put
things into their mouths.
A common source of child-
hood poisoning is alcohol.
A 3 year old who weighs
about 30 pounds could
potentially die after drink-
ing three ounces of 80-
proof liquor, eight ounces
of wine or 23 ounces of
beer.
Alcohol can be found in
other forms as well, such
as perfume and mouth-
wash. Symptoms of alco-
hol poisoning range from
drunken behavior to
seizures, respiratory fail-
ure and coma.
Other common potential
poisoning hazards are
indoor and outdoor plants.
In fact, plants, fungus and
berries are the most com-
monly ingested foreign
objects among children
under the age of 6. Not
only can they be toxic, but
they can obstruct the air-
way if lodged in the
throat. Your local poison
control center can tell you
which plants are toxic. ❑

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