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December 25, 1992 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-12-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Follow Up

A fresh look at recent stories in The Jewish News.

Tzedakah Am
Project
Under Way

ELIZABETH APPLEBAUM

ASSISTANT EDITOR

program initiated last
month to register
ishulochim, tzeda-
kah solicitors, in the
Detroit area already is
attracting between five
and 15 participants a
week, Tzedakah Enhance-
ment Project founders say.
"We are doing very,
very well," according to
Rabbi Elimelech Gold-
berg of Young Israel of
Southfield, one of seven
local Orthodox rabbis

who have expressed sup-
port for the project. "And
I think we've successful-
ly educated the commu-
nity that our purpose (in
starting the program)
was not to exclude any-
one, but rather to en-
hance the giving of
tzedakah."
He added that he has
received nothing but pos-
itive response from the
community. "Everyone
I've spoken to is greatly

in favor of the project."
The program calls for
mishulochim to meet
with members of the
Tzedakah Enhancement
Project, where they are
interviewed and then
provided with documents
verifying affiliation with
the organization they say
they represent.
The plan followed
reports of fraudulent
mishulochim who have
solicited families here.

Members of the Tzeda-
kah Enhancement Pro-
ject say their new pro-
gram will protect the
community from such
individuals.
The
Council
of
Orthodox Rabbis, howev-
er, opposes the registra-
tion of mishulochim, out
of concern for possible
embarrassment to solici-
tors obligated to seek a
letter of approval before
seeking funds.

hree months after
the JCCs' North
American Maccabi
Youth Games in Balti-
more, Detroit's 160 teen
athletes have been sent a
sparkling blue keepsake.

The Detroit Maccabi
Club printed 1,200 copies
of its first ad book, com-
plete with team rosters
and photographs from
the Games. The book
commemorates 10 years
of Maccabi Youth Games.
Detroit has participated
in the Games since their
inception in 1982 and
hosted the North Ameri-
can Games in 1984 and
1990.
Maccabi's Jay Robin-
son said the 36-page
book was sent to all the
athletes, coaches, adver-

tisers "and people who
have helped us in the
past." It is also being dis-
tributed through the
Jewish Community
Center Health Club.
"We raised a few dol-
lars with the book," Mr.
Robinson said, "but first
and foremost it is a sou-
venir for the kids, like a
yearbook."
He confirmed that
Detroit Maccabi athletes
will be competing at two
regional sites next sum-
mer: Pittsburgh and St.
Louis.

in which volunteers read
100 minutes on tape
from each week's news-
paper, is running
smoothly, says project
co-coordinator Sandy
Supowit of NCJW.
"This is the best kind
of community service,"
Ms. Supowit said.
Members of NCJW
pick up the newspaper
each week on Thursday,
and they clip articles of
interest to the visually

impaired readers. Volun-
teers then read the arti-
cles on tape Thursday
evening and Friday
morning before trans-
porting the tape to the
library in Farmington
Hills.
At the library, a small
staff copies the tapes
before mailing them out
to subscribers of a feder-
ally funded program for
the blind. The Jewish
News supplies the news-

papers and the cassette
tapes.
"We get a lot of calls
from clients expressing
their appreciation," Ms.
Supowit said. "Without
our service, they would-
n't be able to read the
paper. It is like the bible
of the Jewish communi-
ty, and without it, they
wouldn't know what was
going on."

Based on a nearly 10-
year-old model from
Denver, Stepping Stones
teaches Jewish tradi-
tions and ways of life to
interfaith couples and
their children. Twenty-
seven families are
enrolled.
For Laura and Allan
Schreibman, Stepping
Stones was the answer.
Upon marrying, the
Schreibmans decided to
raise their children as
Jews. However, they

worried about finding
appropriate religious
training for their ele-
mentary-school children.
Finding someone to
marry the couple was
tough enough.
"This is their (the chil-
dren's) first introduction
to anything Jewish. My
husband's knowledge of
Judaism dates back from
his childhood," Mrs.
Schreibman said. "They
(our children) got their
first dreidels through

Stepping Stones."
Rita Abramson, direc-
tor of Stepping Stones,
emphasized the non-
threatening nature of the
program.
"There is no pressure
toward conversion or to
join a synagogue," Ms.
Abramson said. "The
feeling is, even if fami-
lies don't affiliate they're
experiencing a taste of
how it is and what it
means to be Jewish." ❑

Maccabi
Celebrates
Ten Years

ALAN HITSKY

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

T

foot

MEMPHIS '82 DETROIT '84 TORONTO '86 CHICAGO '88 DETROIT '90

Jewish
News On
Tape Is
Thriving

KIMBERLY LIFTON

J EW IS H NEWS

STAFF WRITER

AL.

A

bout 30 visually
impaired members
of the Detroit Jewish
community are reading
The Jewish News each
week, thanks to a cooper-
ative venture of the
National Council - of
Jewish Women, The
Jewish News and the
Oakland County Library
for the Blind and Physi-
cally Handicapped. ,
Just over a year since
its inception, the project,

Jewish
Traditions
Taught

LESLEY PEARL

STAFF WRITER

T

wo months into its
two-year session,
Stepping Stones is
gathering no moss.

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