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December 04, 1992 - Image 64

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



••

0

DR EA M 0AF HOU SE

It's a once-in-a-lifetime offer for a once-in-a-lifetime Grand Prize!

A brand-new condominium in the heart of West Bloomfield
valued at $175,000!

It's the home you've dreamed about:
a three-bedroom, two bath detached-
condominium ranch, located in the
Lagoons of West Bloomfield, a
development of The Irvine Group.

Don't dream of delaying.

Get your raffle ticket now through
February 12 by stopping during
business hours or sending a check
payable to:

CCWB House Raffle

There are other prizes, too.

C/O: West Bloomfield Parks
and Recreation
3325 Middlebelt Road
(just North of Long Lake Road)
West Bloomfield, MI 48323

Other raffle winners will have a
chance at
• First Prize: a 1993 Beretta GT
from Jack Cauley Chevrolet
• 5 Second Prizes of $1,000 cash
• 25 Third Prizes of $200 cash

For more information call

But hurry: only 5,000 tickets will be
sold, at $150 each.

the Raffle Hotline anytime:
(313) 33-DREAM (333-7326)

Raffle License #R26398. The drawing will be at 3
p.m., Sunday, February 21, 1993, at Pals Restaurant,
5656 West Maple Road, West Bloomfield, Michigan.

B

The drawing will be February 21.

The Michigan Dream Sweepstakes
House Raffle is sponsored by
Concerned Citizens for West Bloomfield
as a benefit for the West Bloomfield
Recreation Activities Center.

UY A DREAM
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ORCHARD LK. RD. NORTH OF MAPLE

Did Negev IDF
Plan A Raid?

Tel Aviv (JTA) — The Israeli
army unit involved in a
training accident in the
Negev three weeks ago was
planning a commando at-
tack on a Shi'ite fundamen-
talist leader in Lebanon, ac-
cording to a report in the
Miami Herald.
If true, the report sheds
light on why the military
censor here barred publica-
tion of several key details of
the accident, in which five
soldiers died and six others
were wounded.
According to the Herald,
the accident occurred hours
before an elite commando
unit of the Israel Defense
Force was to make a strike
in Beirut on Sheik Hassan
Nasrallah, a leader of the
Islamic fundamentalist
Hezbollah, which has
stepped up attacks against
Israel in recent weeks.
The paper said the mission
was scrapped after the ac-
cidental firing of a missile
during what was intended to
be a dry run.
In Jerusalem, the Prime
Minister's Office refused to
confirm or deny the Miami
Herald report.
If the report is accurate, it
would explain why the
military censor initially
barred publication of the
names of top generals who
were present at the training
exercise.
It took 10 days to reveal
that the IDF chief of staff,
Lt. Gen. Ehud Barak, and
his deputy, Maj. Gen. Am-
non Shahak, witnessed the
Nov. 5 accident at the
Tze'elim training grounds.
And it was only after
mounting media pressure
that the censor earlier this
week allowed publication of
the fact that the chief of
army intelligence, Maj. Gen.
Uri Saguy, was present at
the exercise.
Israeli journalists
wondered why the names of
top officers at the ill-fated
training exercise were
blanked out, in contrast to
past practice by the censor.
And when members of the
generally well-informed
Knesset Foreign Affairs and
Defense Committee found
out that the presence of the
top officers had been
withheld, they were outrag-
ed.
But ironically, the ensuing
allegations of an army
coverup shifted public focus
away from questions over

the accident itself to the
broader issue of censorship.
The controversy over
reporting of the affair
underlines the ambivalence
of Israeli journalists as they
report on defense issues.
Like all other eligible
Israelis, reporters serve in
the army reserves, and there
is not much they are not
aware of. Their efforts to in-
form the public are balanced
by a desire to protect nation-
al security.
These considerations stand
in contrast with the perspec-
tive of major overseas media,
whose correspondents are
assigned to Israel for a year
or two before being posted
elsewhere. Their insistence
on the public's right to know
remains unqualified.
The-powers of Israel's chief
military censor derive from
a 1945 law dating to the
period of the British Man-
date. At the time, it was vig-

There is not much
they are not
aware of.

orously opposed by the Jew-
ish Yishuv as an attempt to
stifle protests against the
anti-Zionist policies of the
British.
Later, an understanding
was reached with Israeli
editors tempering the sum-
mary powers of the military
censor to close down a news-
paper for infractions.
A three-member appeals
board rules on appeals
against censorship rulings,
with the army chief of staff
remaining the final court of
appeal. The board represents
the censor and the editors,
with a neutral civilian as the
swing vote.
Last week, the country's
most respected newspaper
announced its withdrawal
from the agreement.
Ha' aretz said it would look to
the Supreme Court rather
than the chief of staff as the
final court of appeal.
Whether other news
organizations follow suit
remains to be seen.
But one thing is clear: The
Tze'elim incident has had an
impact on Israeli national
affairs far beyond that of a
simple army training acci-
dent, of which there have
been several in recent mon-
ths.

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