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December 04, 1992 - Image 36

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Media Monitor

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he explosion of neo-
Nazi violence in Ger-
many has caused
much hand-wringing,
finger-waving and predic-
tions of a new racist
apocalypse. New York Times
columnist, A.M. Rosenthal,
for instance, expects that
"someday, Europe and
America will have to put
together an international
effort against Nazism. Only
two questions remain: Will
action come before the crisis
explodes? And for each mon-
th that passes, what will be
the price in lives, tears and
the worth of mankind?"
Mr, Rosenthal scolded that
the world is paying the price
of letting Germany "rush"
into reunification two years
ago "as if memories of Nazis,
Auschwitz, Rotterdam, slave
labor, Holocaust were not an
indelible part of human his-
tory."
But USA Today founder
and columnist Al Neuharth
isn't quite so ready to run to
the barricades. Americans,
he said, should not be so
quick to criticize Germans
since more hate-based
violence occurs in the U.S.
than in Germany: Since
1990, hate-motivated
violence caused the deaths of
11 to 16 people in Germany
and about 3,140 persons in
the U.S.
Mr. Neuharth advised
Americans to support Ger-
man Chancellor Helmut
Kohl's "efforts at control (of
the burgeoning neo-Nazi
violence), not blame him for
the problem. And admit that
hatred hits harder in the
USA than it does in Ger-
many."
In a column not directly
linked to the violence in
Germany, syndicated urban
affairs specialist Neal Pierce
said that "immigration is
not the chief culprit trigger-
ing economic and social
distress in (European cities)
. . . The underlying cause is
the profound economic
change that has seized cities
across the North Atlantic
community. Huge job losses,
especially in manufacturing,
have stranded millions of
less-skilled city residents,
native-born and immigrant
alike."
And finally, two entirely
disparate views. In a column
in the New York Times,

A.M. Rosenthal: Is neo-Nazism
the price of headlong reunifica-
tion?

Christoph Bertram, diplo-
matic correspondent for the
German newsweekly, Die
Zeit, urged changing the
German law that makes it
"extremely difficult" for for-
eigners living in Germany to
become citizens. "Large-
scale naturalization of for-
eigners would not . . .
remove xenophobia," he
admitted, but it would create
a "lobby for foreigners"
within the society,
"watchdogs against discrim-
ination." Although
minorities, he noted, have

The underlying
cause is the
profound
economic change.

protested violence against
Turks in Germany, "all
these voices . . . do not speak
as strongly in defense of
Turks in Germany as Ger-
man Turks would."
Meanwhile, in a letter
published in USA Today,
Jarl Carlsson of Chicago
claims that the news media
has "sensationalized" ac-
counts of German violence.
"Germany is not a melting
pot," he wrote. "It is un-
reasonable to expect work-
ing-class Germans to foot the
bill for the absorption of an
endless string of misplaced
`refugees'. . . Germans have
a right to stop the foreign
invasion of their land and to
live among their own folk as
they have for thousands of
years."

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