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November 27, 1992 - Image 44

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-11-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DETROIT'S
HIGHEST
RATES

12 MONTH CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT
MINIMUM DEPOSIT $500

4.000%
4.060%*

This is a fixed rate account
that is insured to $100,000 by
the Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation (FDIC), Substan-
tial Interest Penalty for early
withdrawal from certificate
accounts. Rates subject to
change without notice.
* Effective Annual Yield When
Compounded Quarterly.

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SAVINGS BANK

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2600 Telegraph Rd.

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44

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EQUAL HOUSING

LENDER
HOURS:
MON.-THURS. 9:30-4:30, FRI. 9:30-6:00

Thanksgiving Displays
Many Jewish Roots

PHILIP SLOMOVITZ EDITOR EMERITUS

T

hanksgiving lifts us to
the highest spirit of
Americanism and
humaneness. It is also
a unifying force which
makes us rejoice in observ-
ing our way of life as Ameri-
cans who take pride in what
benefits people while rejec-
ting the prejudicial.
As Jews we are also
uplifted by every occasion
which draws upon the
psalms, our Tehillim, giving
us encouragement to aspire
to high ideals. It is part of
our commitment in the na-
tional desire to eliminate
want and to strive for
knowledge as well as com-
fort.
There is a specific Jewish
definition which is worth
considering and which our
fellow citizens of an faiths
may welcome. We read of
Tehillim in the Encyclopedia
of the Jewish Religion:
Biblical expressions of
Tehillim frequently com-
mence with barukh
("blessed be") and hence
the statutory opening
formula ("Blessed art
Thou 0 Lord, our God,
King of the Universe ...)
of the Benedictions ut-
tered in Tehillim to God

There is a form of
redemption marked
by the
continuation of
Jewish entities.

before enjoying anything
in this world.
Other benedictions of
Tehillim are recited on
special occasions, e.g. on
hearing good news, on
recurring joyful events,
and on deliverance from
peril (e.g. after safely
journeying through
desert regions or return-
ing from the sea, or being
released from captivity or
prison, and on recovering
from sickness). The latter
blessing is known as
gomel. Tehillim is the
theme of many psalms
which have, for this
reason, been included in
the liturgy.
Volumes have been
written on the subject of

Norman Rockwell's Thanksgiving.

thanksgiving and the many
psalms constantly utilized in
all liturgies keep inspiring
us. It is an endless subject
and the rejoicing is a spiri-
tual force for all, regardless
of religious affiliation.

Redemption
Defies Bigotry

It is now undeniably main-
tained that anti-Semitism
has become increasingly
repulsive on a world scale. In
many areas it has promoted
exodus in our time. Such
redemption is a realization
of the Zionist ideal.
There also is a form of
redemption marked by de-
fiant continuation of Jewish
entities where Nazism
previously dominated. An
example of this is the exis-
tence of a synagogue in
Heidelberg, the educational
center in Germany. The
occurrence is revealed in the
following excerpted from the
World Jewish Congress cur-
rent news summary:
The Heidelberg Jewish
community has laid the
cornerstone for a new
synagogue and Jewish
community center the
first since World War II.
Jews lived in Heidelberg
as early as 1350. In 1390,
they were expelled and

their synagogue was con-
fiscated. They were allow-
ed to return in the middle
of the 17th century.

The community syn-
agogue, built in 1878, was
destroyed by the Nazis in
the Kristallnacht pogrom
on Nov. 10, 1938.
This is interesting because
it provides an opportunity to
share with our readers
knowledge about Jewish
historical backgrounds rela-
ting to Heidelberg. There is
much in German-Jewish his-
tory that will remain. The
story of Heidelberg is ac-
counted for in the Standard
Jewish Encyclopedia:

German town. Jews are
mentioned there in the
late 13th century. The
community was martyred
during the Black Death
massacres (1349), but
renewed from 1360 to
1391. Individuals settled
there from the late 15th
century and in 1714, a
synagogue was con-
secrated. The number of
Jews grew in the 18th cen-
tury against the wishes of
the local population, and
in 1819, Hep! Hep! riots
broke out. The 1933 Jew-
ish community, number-
ing 1,400, was annihilated.
There was never an
absence of anit-Semitism in

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