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October 24, 1992 - Image 50

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-10-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

You've come to
expect this level
of luxury in
Bloomfield Hills.
But not at this price.

Some
of the
smartest
homes in
Michigan
have one
thing in
common ...

Within the city limits of Bloomfield Hills, the
smart money is buying at Boulder Park. Come
see our brand new collection of classic two-
story plans with first floor Master Suites at
remarkably affordable prices.

MICHIGAN m
DESIGN
CENTER

OLI1 JUIJLJE,
!DDODIDEE
.:1111LJULMJECI
ULJLILUDG

Something
extraordinary.

One-stop
shopping
for the
very finest

fabrics
furniture
floorcovering
wallcovering
lighting
tile
kitchens
original art
and
accessories

[33

for you
through your
interior designer.

Discover MDC's

DESIGNER/ARCHITECT
REFERRAL SERVICE

Call 649-4772 for this
Complimentary Service

vii CA\
DaG\
ceNeR

48 •

FALL 1992 • STYLE

Located on Woodward north of Lone Pine.

Wineman & Komer Building Company
Model: 647-9580 Office: 350-9090
Open Daily & Weekends 12-5 p.m.
(Closed Thursday)
Broker Participation Invited

INVEST
in a

REAL GROWTH
OPPORTUNITY

'TIM /1 1 l'11111


111 11111111 41' 1 1

LANDSCAPING, INC.

Complete Landscape
Specialists

398.8700

• New Construction
• Re-landscaping
• Commercial Maintenance
• Commercial snow removal

Kenneth Shecter
Michael Shecter

MUSEUM REPRODUCTIONS

Besides furniture for home interiors, the
Smithsonian has licensed Brown Jordan to re-
produce casual furniture from its garden col-
lections and Henry Link, a division of Lex-
ington Industries, to reproduce wicker
furniture from turn-of-the-century designs.
Among Link's signature wicker pieces are the
Augusta wing chair, with its side pocket and
an extra-wide arm rest, and a narrow day-
lounger that would have been called a "faint-
ing couch" in the early 1800s.
The Henry Ford Museum & Greenfield Vil-
lage offers reproductions and adaptations of
18th and 19th century cherry, mahogany, and
painted American furniture that is less high
style than some reproduction collections and
in a more comfortable price range.

Most museum reproduction programs are
"firmly rooted in the 18th century," says con-
sultant Grenewald, "because of the value of
the original antiques and because manufac-
turers are looking toward a conservative and
traditional buyer who appreciates the beauty
and craftsmanship of 18th century furniture."
Still, even the most pristine programs ex-
tend their lines to cover terrific Neoclassical
furniture from the early 19th century. And the
Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, working with
Archetype Associates of Brooklyn, licensed
the Italian firm Cassina to reproduce 20th cen-
tury furniture designs by the world-renowned
architect This past summer, four new pieces
were added to the line, including reproduc-
tions of the Husser dining table from 1899;
the Taliesin 3 tables, a nest of small occasional
tables designed for Wright's wife Olgivanna;
an office desk and chair from Wright's 1937
Johnson Wax Building; and the Coonley 2
chair, a 1907 spindle-back dining chair with
an upholstered seat.
Museum reproductions are definitely heir-
looms. But will they become the "antiques of
the future," as some enthusiasts claim? Only
time will tell. But there is evidence in the fur-
niture's favor: A set of 12 George II chairs, re-
produced by Kindel from an original at the
headquarters of the Irish Georgian Society,
was auctioned at Sotheby's in 1991 for
$17,000 $2,000 over their 1986 retail cost,
and $7,000 above their estimated value.

(continued on page 54)

Beth Smith is a contributing editor to STYLE

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