100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

October 24, 1992 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-10-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Brownstone InBirmingham

ARCHITECT VICTOR SAROKI, BUILDER MARTIN GEORGE AND INTERIOR DESIGNER ROHN GOLDMAN
CREATE A TURN-OF-THE-CENTURY BROWNSTONE IN DOWNTOWN BIRMINGHAM.

I

f you like living in a city, it's as good as it's going to
get," says Victor Saroki of Victor Saroki and
Associates Architects, RC., of Birmingham, who
designed the urbane new Merrill Park Townhomes
in Birmingham.
Martin George, of M. George Construction Company
in Farmington Hills, built the seven townhouses over-
looking the activity of downtown Birmingham. These
city dwellings were patterned after turn-of-the-century
brownstone townhouses in Boston. Mr. Saroki and Mr.
George visited neighborhoods in Boston, New York
and Philadelphia in their quest for design authenticity
and inspiration.
"We wanted to do a very upscale group of elegant

attached homes in downtown Birmingham," says Mr
Saroki. "We wanted to build townhouses that would
become classic landmarks."
Mr. Saroki's goal is well on its way to being estab-
lished. Each Merrill Park townhome is unique and yet
harmonizes with the others. The exterior of each of the
burgundy brick townhouses is different, each with its
own window designs, bay window, wood and glass
front doors, entryways, gable roofs, and brick and
stone detailing. The interior layout designs were ini-
tially the same, but each unit has been customized,
creating seven distinct units.
"They each have a sense of rhythm, each is individ-
ual," says Mr. Saroki.

BY LISA BRODY / PHOTOGRAPHY BY BEFIT SINGER

STYLE • FALL 1992 • ll

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan