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October 16, 1992 - Image 50

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-10-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE
JULIUS CHAJES
MUSIC FUND
CONCERT SERIES
1992-1993 SEASON

The Sukkot Message:
Ecology, Thanksgiving

DR. RICHARD C. HERTZ SPECIAL TO THE JEWISH NEWS

Sunday Salon Series in the
Janice Charach Epstein Museum/Gallery

Sunday, October 25, 1992, 3:30 p.m.

THE RACKHAM STRING QUARTET

Winner, Gustav Rosseels Prize in Chamber Music.
Winner, Coleman Chamber Music Competition.
Winner, Carmel Chamber Music Competition.
Winner, Fischoff Chamber Music Competition.

General Admission $10.00
Senior Citizens & Students $8.00

at the

JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
OF METROPOLITAN DETROIT
6600 West Maple Road
West Bloomfield

For Season Subscription and Ticket
Information call Annette Chajes at
the Center 661-1000

Yours to Discover

"Pleasures

Treasures"

At Congregation Beth Shalom Auction

Saturday, November 7, 1992
Doors Open: 7:30 P.M.

Silent and Live Auction Excitement

Featuring: Automobiles, Furs, Trips & More



Refreshments... Dessert Buffet

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T

he regular order of
Torah readings is in-
terrupted this Shabbat
because it is the Sabbath dur-
ing Sukkot. It bears a special
name, Shabbat Hol HaMoed
Sukkot. The reading from the
Torah on Sukkot is a special
portion from Exodus: 33-34. It
contains a description of the
nature of God and the at-
tributes of God listed in
34:6-7.
There is something anti-
climactic about the festival of
Sukkot. Coming only five
days after the spiritual ex-
altation of the High Holy
Days, when great crowds
thronged the synagogues and
people were in a reverent
mood after having filled
themselves with a full year's
spiritual diet, Sukkot suffers
from its timing. People feel a
letdown. Sukkot has a very
different message from the
Holy Days. It is our ecology
festival.
Sukkot is a joyous time of
thanksgiving over the
harvest time when the earth
is filled with the colors of the
rainbow.
The transition in so short a
time is difficult for the
modern Jew. Most Jews in
America live in the big cities
and their suburbs. They have
little contact with farm pro-
ducts except through shopp-
ing in the supermarkets.
Even the sukkot in the
suburbs seem incongruous. In
ancient times they served a
very practical function.
The sukkah commemorates
the flimsy but required by
desert wanderings. It also
reminds Jews of the misfor-
tunes of those in poverty and
want. No matter the weather,
the sukkah reminds us of the
world of nature from which
we have become estranged.
Sukkot, our ecology
festival, becomes an impor-
tant reminder for people to-
day. The festival's lesson
teaches that man must have
confidence not in his own
strength nor his own fortune,
but must place his faith in
Divine Providence. The
festival rewards those who
enter the sukkah with a
sense of deep and abiding
tranquility.
Yet in an age when we can
be thankful for so much
because we have so much, it

Dr. Hertz is rabbi emeritus of

Temple Beth El.

is hard to see the
wastefulness today.
We have good food but we
ruin it with chemical sprays.
We have an abundant supp-
ly of drinking water but we
make it distasteful by dump-
ing industrial sludge into our
streams.
We can be joyful for clear
blue skies, but not when we
choke on smog and inhale an
overabundance of auto
emissions.
We can rejoice at the tran-
quility of our quiet lakes but
cringe at all the useless noise
in the city.

Shabbat Hol
HaMoed Sukkot:
Exodus 33:12.34:26
Ezekiel 38:18.39:16,

We can marvel at the rich
hues of green fields, but recoil
at the litter that is such an
eyesore in our city.
We can look at our sukkot
without fear of persecution
from speaking out against
people we disagree with,
without fear of being im-
prisoned or punished because
of our religion. Soviet Jews
were not able to practice
openly the religion of our
forefathers for generations
until many of them stood up
and were willing to speak out
and fight for their religious
freedom.
Sukkot is a time of
thanksgiving that dates back
to an ancient agriculture
festival.
The underlying idea of the
sukkah is the symbol of our
dependence on God for His
mercy. The frail sukkah sym-
bolizing this fragile and tran-
sitory life serves as a
reminder that material
things have little per-
manence. The joyous and
gratitude of this holiday
should be a constant
reminder of the blessings
granted us by a generous God.
The festival of Sukkot not on-
ly reminds us of God's help in
ages past but points us in the
direction of a proper apprecia-
tion of our present and future.
We are grateful for the simple
things of life. We can thank
God in this festival of
Thanksgiving for all our
blessings showered upon us
by a generous God.



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