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October 09, 1992 - Image 52

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-10-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Travel

THE
JULIUS CHAJES
MUSIC FUND
CONCERT SERIES
1992-1993 SEASON

Jerusalem Discovers
New Kind Of Nightlife

Sunday Salon Series in the
Janice Charach Epstein Museum/Gallery

Sunday, October 25, 1992, 3:30 p.m.

THE RACKHAM STRING QUARTET

Winner, Gustav Rosseels Prize in Chamber Music.
Winner, Coleman Chamber Music Competition.
Winner, Carmel Chamber Music Competition.
Winner, Fischoff Chamber Music Competition.

General Admission $10.00
Senior Citizens & Students $8.00

at the

JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
OF METROPOLITAN DETROIT
6600 West Maple Road
West Bloomfield

For Season Subscription and Ticket

Information call Annette Chajes at
the Center 661-1000

Packages Include:

• Round trip jet flights via scheduled airlines.
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airport and baggage handling.
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• Sugar and Salt Free Diet • Free Chaise Lounges • Soft
• All tips included. No additional tipping.
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All taxes included.
Service Twice Daily • Weekly Cocktail Parties • Planned
• All rooms: 2 beds — private tub and shower, color
Entertainment Daily and Every Night. Shows, Music
and Dancing, Variety, Concerts, Champagne Hour.
cable TV, waterview, ice water, walk-in closet, NC,
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Oneg Shabbat, Bingo • Two Magnificent Sightseeing
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• Full breakfast and dinner daily.
Rabbinical Supervision. Resident Mash iach.
Three meals Saturda y
DEC. 22-JAN. 26, 1993
JAN. 26-FEB. 23, 1993
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35 NIGHTS
28 NIGHTS
21 NIGHTS
$2,242.00
$2 9 102.00 $1 9 472 • 00
._._

ips may be combined at significantly reduced rates.
FOR INFORMATION AND RESERVATIONS,
CALL MIRIAM-DONESON WORLD CLASS TRAVEL, (315) 353-5811.
DIRECT TO TARLETON 1-800-327-3110.

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Call The Jewish News

354-5959

DANNY BEN TAL

Special to The Jewish News

A

few years back, Tel
Aviv trendies could be
found wearing a T-
shirt with a large blacked-out
square, under which appeared
the cynical motif "Nighttime
in Jerusalem." No-one wears
that T-shirt any more.
"Jerusalem has woken up
over the past five years," ex-
plains 22-year-old secretary
Shosh Abadi. "My married
brothers and sisters keep ask-
ing, 'Where were all the clubs
when we were single?' For
them, a night out on the town
meant a trip to Tel Aviv."
Until recently, Jerusalem
was known as a city of cliques
— of invitation-only house
parties and intimate social
gatherings. A typical night
out, for those unable to afford
the Jerusalem Theater's
subscriptions, might include
an intimate jazz or folk show
at the tiny Tzavta or Pargod
theaters, followed by a mixed
grill at one of the unpreten-
tious Oriental eateries in the
shuk, or market district.
Pubs, discos and the like were
for the fleshpots of Tel Aviv
and Eilat.
Like almost everything in
Israel, our story has its roots
in politics. In 1987, a group of
sharp-minded local politi-
cians noticed a loophole in
municipal Sabbath entertain-
ment bylaws. Opening movie
houses on Friday nights is of-
ficially banned, cultural
events are not. And so the
Citizens' Rights Movement
(CRM), among others, began
inviting the paying public to
a series of weekly "cultural
events" — usually a five-
minute lecture followed by a
full-length feature film. (One
one occasion, The Witches of
Eastwick was preceded by a
tongue-in-cheek soliloquy on
psychic phenomena). But
beyond making a political
point, they set a precedent for
entertainment-starved
secular Jerusalemites.
Faced with vociferous op-
position from the Orthodox,
the CRM took its case to a
local district court where it
won Jerusalemites the crucial
"right to party." "Within a
fortnight, five other cinemas
opened for Friday night show-
ings," recalls Ornan
Yekutieli, a CRM city coun-
cilman who now heads the
Municipal Culture
Department.
Movies were just the tip of
the iceberg. "More than 20
new pubs and bars opened

over the next six months," Mr.
Yekutieli recounts. "Aspiring
young entrepreneurs opened
all-night discos and dance
clubs. The domino effect was
unbelievable — it was if
Jerusalemites had discovered
the night."
Supply could hardly keep
pace with demand, as
previously dormant revellers
crawled out of the city's an-
cient stonework. Two
separate nightlife areas
emerged — the historic Rus-
sian Compound and nearby
Nahlat Shiva neighborhood
became the capital's publand,
while the recently-
constructed Talpiot industrial
zone, transformed into its
disco heartland. "Thousands
of teen-age pilgrims began
flocking to the discos," said
Avi Morduch, owner of
Talpiot's highly popular,
cavernous Hanger disco.
Instead of carloads of
Jerusalemites heading down
to Tel Aviv for the night, the
reverse began to happen.

Jerusalem is
where the action
is nowadays.

"Suddenly, there was
something vibrant about the
capital's atmosphere," notes
Ms. Abadi, who works in Tel
Aviv but prefers to party in
Jerusalem. "Jerusalemites
can be crazy at times. It's as
if they've been allowed to
show their freakiness."
Leaning against a trendy
Tel Aviv after-hours bar, elec-
tronic engineer-cum-budding
rock musician Guy Raveh
sighed when I brought up the
subject. "Jerusalem — now
that's where the action is
nowadays. I would move there
today if I could. Tel Avivians
aren't as loose — they've
become too preoccupied with
putting up a show." His black-
clad drinking partner could
only shrug in agreement.
Not everything is new, of
course. Jerusalem has its
more traditional nightspots,
like the Cinematheque bar-
restaurant, popular with
students and tourists; the La
Belle bistro-bar, visited most-
ly by foreign journalists and
unattached forty-somethings,
the Tavern, catering to
tourists and Anglo-
Jerusalemites; Jan's Tea
House, specializing in low-
pitched conversation while
squatting Bedouin-style on
cushions; and the Red House
in Motza which regularly
hosts old-style sing-alongs.

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