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August 28, 1992 - Image 60

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-08-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

BACK-TO-SCHOOL

HEBREW FOR ALL --
ALL ABOUT HEBREW

At Our
New Hebrew
Interactive Learning Center

Excellent exciting faculty

Full selection of instructional materials
including videos, audio cassettes, books,
curricula for all levels

State of the art interactive video

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR: HOWARD GELBERD
DIRECTOR: NIRA LEV

HEBREW INTERACTIVE
LEARNING CENTER
ns`r.rin

AGENCY FOR JEWISH EDUCATION

The Best Alternative to Being

There -

is Learning

Here

FOR INFORMATION CALL: 352-7117

NURSERY SCHOOL

Fall Classes Begin
Wednesday, September 9th

18 MONTHS — 6 YEARS










Flexible scheduling to fit your needs
Full or half-day sessions extended days
Lunch/breakfast options
Certified/experienced teachers
Parent-Toddler classes
Arts and crafts
Outdoor activities
Enrichment classes

Classes available for:
PUBLIC SCHOOL KINDERGARTNERS

* * ROUNDUP * *
TUESDAY, SEPT. 1ST, 7:00 P.M.

Formerly United Hebrew Schools Nursery School

Agency for Jewish Education
21550 W. 12 Mile, Southfield, MI 48076

4,1 w _„,a2L0A1,_&
/

LL=00In n

For information and application
Call Carol Gale, Director
356-7378 or 3544050

al

Brown Bag Basics
Make The Grade

SHARON ACHATZ

Special to The Jewish News

L

et's face it. You can
lead a child to the
lunch table, but you
can't make him eat.
Parents have fought the
brown-bag battle for years,
trying to find a balance be-
tween the nutrition they
want for their children and
the tastes that they crave —
trying to create a basically
healthy lunch that kids will
eat rather than trade away.
There's plenty of help on the
horizon, most notably in
books such as The Creative
Lunch Box by Ellen Klavan
(Crown) and The Penny Whis-
tle Lunch Box Book by Mere-
dith Brokaw and Annie
Gilbar (Fireside).
While each tome is filled
with its own words of wisdom
for making the contents of a
child's lunch box as irresisti-
ble as a Twinkie, both hold
basic tenets to be true.
Among them:
• Food must be delicious,
which means including the
flavors a child favors. Even if
that means packing peanut
butter every day. The trick is
to mix it with other options —
such as apple slices, bananas,
pasta or fresh veggies — to
help provide a balanced diet.
• Food must look good.
Children delight in pretty
things, unusual shapes and
clever design. Create a mini-
sub sandwich on a hot-dog
bun; send fruit salad in a
hollowed-out orange peel;
make a lollipop out of turkey
and a bread stick; fill dates
with cream cheese.
• Lunch must be fun.
Throw in an extra treat with
a note saying "Surprise!" or
tie it up with a ribbon. Jot
down a joke, or include color-
ful forks and spoons, seasonal
napkins, a crazy straw.
If the child carries lunch in
a bag, decorate it with pretty
stickers or stamps — or make
it an animal puppet with con-
struction paper cutouts.
If a child has tired of the
same old bag or lunch-box
routine, consider alternatives
such as a small knapsack or
fanny pack, a straw basket or
his own personal-size in-
sulated ice chest.
Aside from the basic tenets,
the books offer a multitude of
recipes and informal ideas on
nutritious lunch-box crea-
tions from sandwiches and
soups to dips and desserts.
Many of the ideas work just
as well for ensuring a sound
nutritive base at breakfast —

a meal parents know a child
can't trade away — and for
having on hand a well-
stocked pantry and
refrigerator full of healthful
after-school snacks.
Research indicates that
children rely on what's readi-
ly at hand when it comes to
snacking, so keep lots of dried
fruit, nuts, yogurt, pretzels,
popcorn, fruits, cheese
spreads, breads and cut-up
vegetables at the ready — and
within easy sight.
As for lunch boxes, sand-
wiches are the meal of choice
for most parents, as they're
one of the most efficient ways
to make sure a child gets food
from at least two of the basic
food groups — grain and pro-
tein. In many cases, parents
can slip in dairy products,
fruits or vegetables as well.
Easy as sandwiches are,
however, they quickly can

Children rely on
what's readily
available when it
comes to snacking
— so keep lots of
healthy treats on
hand.

become a rut. Here are some
alternatives to the same-old-
sandwich routine:
• Roll-ups. Cut the crust off
a slice of bread, roll it out thin
and then spoon on a spread.
Roll up the bread for jelly-roll
sandwiches such as Tuna
Swirls, or slice the rolls into
pretty pinwheels one-half-
inch thick.
Or, skip the bread entirely.
Instead, roll up a thin slice of
lettuce around a traditional
tuna or chicken salad filling,
a slice of turkey around a
broccoli spear or crunchy
bread stick.
• Cutups. Kids get a kick
out of little sandwiches
shaped as hearts, stars and
animals. Just get out the
cookie cutters and, once the
sandwich is made, cut out the
favored shapes. Or use free-
hand cutting to create the
first letter of a child's name.
Free-form cutting also
works well for other foods —
for example, creating an "L"
lunch for Lisa with a tuna
sandwich, cheese slices and
melon chunks all cut into
capital L's.
• Beyond bread. Here are
several alternatives to basic
bread that make super sit-
upons for all sorts of sandwich
Continued on Page 62

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