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August 28, 1992 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-08-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

9 4 2

Celebrating 50 years of growth with the Detroit Jewish Community

1 9 9 2

THE JEWISH NEWS

29 AV 5752/AUGUST 2 8 , 1 9 9 2

Shaarey Zedek
Unveils Center

Congregation Shaarey Zedek will open
its new Parenting Center and
Nursery School to the community.

PHIL JACOBS MANAGING EDITOR

t Ruth Beresh's
Passover seder,
the matzah of
hope in past
years stood for
the plight of the
Jews prohibited
from leaving the Soviet
Union or Ethiopia.
With the modern-day
miracles still bringing
thousands of new im-
migrants daily into
Israel and the United
States, her family's
prayers were answered.
Last year, the Beresh
matzah of hope hit clos-
er to home.
"It was my hope that
this huge assimilation

and apathy that faces
Judaism won't do us
in," she said.
As Ms. Beresh and
many others know, the
prayer behind the
matzah of hope can
come true. On Sunday,
August 30, Congrega-
tion Shaarey Zedek will
dedicate the opening of
its Eugene and Marcia
Applebaum Beth Haye-
led Building and Jew-
ish Parenting Center
with ceremonies begin-
ning at 2 p.m. at the
Walnut Lake and
Green Road location.
The Parenting Cen-
PARENTING/page 114

Inside

DETROIT

CLOSE-UP

Blood Drive

Over 500 donors participated in a drive to
find a bone marrow match for
Dr. Raphael Maurice Herschfus.

page 15

SPORTS

Maccabi Games

2,600 athletes gather in Baltimore to
compete for the gold.

page 72

BACK TO SCHOOL

Special Supplement

As summer's end nears, school bells
can't be far away.

page 43

Contents on page 5

What Makes Shoshana Run?

Shoshana Cardin has confronted several world leaders
including President Bush. Now she wants another term
as spokesman for American Jewry.

Story on page 24

Making the Connection

Laurie Nosanchuk of West Bloomfield heads the UAHC's first camp for autistic
Jewish children.

ELIZABETH APPLEBAUM/ASSISTANT EDITOR

Detroit soccer players Lauren Kippelman and Haley
Berger were in Baltimore for the Maccabi Games.
Story on page 72

reg is 12 years old and
cannot walk or speak or
use the bathroom by
himself.
What he can do is
swim. So when Greg at-
tended Jewish camp
this summer, his fa-
vorite time of the day
was going to the pool. A teen counselor al-
ways was waiting for him there. He would
pick Greg up from his wheelchair, the boy's
thin and crippled body in his arms, and car-
ry him to the water.
The camp, for autistic and other impaired
Jewish children, was called Kesher, "con-
nection" in Hebrew. Sponsored by the Union
of American Hebrew Congregations (UAHC)
and headed by West Bloomfield resident
Laurie Nosanchuk, the week-long camp was
held this summer, at Camp Kutz in New
York, for the first time ever.
Six children attended Kesher including
Greg; Candace, who can spell virtually any-
thing; Lana and Lindsay, local students with

whom Mrs. Nosanchuk works and described
as "great helpers"; David, whose favorite part
of camp was the music program; and Lee, who
loved anything that had to do with Hebrew.
By the end of camp, Lee had learned numer-
ous brachot and could recite the aleph-bet for-
wards and backwards.
"It was a lot of work," said Mrs. Nosan-
chuck, a special education teacher at Lone
Pine High School. "But it turned out to be so
rewarding. I could never even have predict-
ed how rewarding it would be."
The idea for the camp came up at a NFTY,
National Federation of Temple Youth, lead-
ership conference following the recent UAHC
biennial in Baltimore. There, UAHC head
Rabbi Alexander Schindler "called on the
Reform movement to make sure we were pro-
viding services for all our members, includ-
ing those who have special needs," according
to David Frank, director of education and
programming for the UAHC's youth division.
Providing services meant more than just
a camp with fun programs. "Our desire was

KESHER/page 30

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