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August 21, 1992 - Image 40

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1992-08-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

BAC KG ROU N D

ANNUAL MEETING OF THE
JEWISH FEDERATION
OF METROPOLITAN DETROIT

Syria

Continued from Page 38

Nominees to the Board of Governors

Pursuant to the bylaws of the JEWISH FEDERATION OF METROPOLITAN DETROIT, the
following list of nominees, selected from the membership of the Federation, eligible for election
to the Board of Governors of the Federation, has been presented to the Executive Vice-
President not less than 30 days prior to the Annual Meeting, to take place on Tuesday,
October 1 at Congregation Shaarey Zedek at 6:30 p.m.

FOR RE-ELECTION
3-Year Term Ending in 1995
Joel Gershenson
Dulcie Rosenfeld
Penny Blumenstein
Benjamin F. Rosenthal
Stanley D. Frankel Edward C. Levy, Jr.

Eugene Driker
Douglas M. Etkin
Marvin H. Goldman

FOR ELECTION
3-Year Term Ending in 1995
Sharon Hart
Barbara Grant
Mark R. Hauser
Carolyn Greenberg
James Grosfeld
Joel E. Jacob

Brian E. Kepes
Sheila Potiker
Rabbi Efry Spectre

Other persons may be nominated by petition or petitions signed by not fewer than 25 members
of the Federation and filed with the Executive Vice-President of the Federation not less than
ten days prior to the date of the Annual Meeting. Only one person may be nominated in
each petition and no nomination shall be valid unless the nominees have consented to be a
candidate.

1992 NOMINATING COMMITTEE

Joel D. Tauber
Chairman

Susan Citrin
Jerome Y. Halperin

Michael S. Feldman
Jack A. Robinson

THE BYLAWS OF
THE JEWISH FEDERATION OF METROPOLITAN DETROIT
ARE PROPOSED TO BE AMENDED
BY THE ADDITION OF THE FOLLOWING:

1. The words "Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit" shall be globally substituted for the words
"Jewish Welfare Federation" or "Jewish Welfare Federation of Detroit."

2. The words "United Jewish Foundation" shall be globally substituted for the words "United Jewish
Charities."

3. Article III, Section 2 (a) shall be deleted and the following substituted in its place and stead:

"(a) Forty-two at-large members, 14 of whom shall be elected at each annual meeting of
members to serve for three years. However, an at-large member of the Board who has served two
consecutive terms of three years each, not including any partial term, shall not be eligible for re-
election until one year has elapsed from the expiration of the last term of service. Any at-large
member of the Board of Governors who is completing his or her last year of his or her last term of
office and who is elected as an officer to the Board of Governors shall be allowed to extend his or
her term of office for one additional term of three years."

4. Article III, Section 2 (c) shall be deleted and the following substituted in its place:

"(c) The retiring President of the Federation and the retiring Chairman of the Executive Committee,
following the completion of his or her term of office for the remainder of his or her lifetime, so long
as he or she chooses to so serve."

5. Article III, Section 2 shall be amended by the addition of Section 2(h) to read as follows:

"(h) Members of Federation who have attained the office of National Chairman of the United Jew-
ish Appeal or President of the Council of Jewish Federations for the remainder of his or her
lifetime so long as he or she chooses to so serve."

6. Article IV, Section 1 (a) (5) shall be deleted and the following substituted in its place:

"(5) The retiring President of the Federation and the retiring Chairman of the Executive Committee,
following the completion of his or her term of office for the remainder of his or her lifetime, so long
as he or she chooses to so serve."

7. Article IV, Section 1 (a) (8) shall be added to read as follows:

"(8) Members of Federation who have attained the office of National Chairman of the United
Jewish Appeal or President of the Council of Jewish Federations for the remainder of his or her
lifetime so long as he or she chooses to so serve."

BYLAWS COMMITTEE
Doreen Hermelin
Conrad L. Giles, M.D. Mark R. Hauser

JEWISH FEDERATION OF METROPOLITAN DETROIT
Robert P. Aronson, Executive Vice-President
6735 Telegraph Road • Bloomfield Hills MI 48301 • (313) 642-4260

!iJ

9.41/4

IWO"'

Nod ..**..sh Camp•gn

Scud-B missiles with which
Iraq bombarded Israel dur-
ing the Gulf War.
First news of the tests,
which occurred in late July,
came during the Israeli
leader's visit to the United
States last week from a
"senior official," widely
believed to be Mr. Rabin
himself.
Deputy Defense Minister
Mordechai Gur confirmed
the missile tests and said it
must be assumed that "in
light of its anti-Israeli past,
Syria intends using them."
Interviewed on Israeli
Army Radio, Mr. Gur
declined to be drawn out on
the timing of a possible
clash, but he observed dryly
that "the combination of the
capability and a certain po-
litical or military situation
could undoubtedly cause
them to use the missiles."
In previous conflicts, Syria
was defeated "fairly quickly
and fairly easily," said Mr.
Gur, and Israel still retains
the military edge. He did
not, however, believe that
such knowledge would
necessarily act as a deter-
rent: "When it comes to war
you cannot rely on logic."
According to leading
Israeli military analyst
Ze'ev Schiff, the Syrian mis-
siles are capable of carrying
larger warheads more accu-
rately than the Iraqi Scuds.
He added: "And, it should be
remembered that Syria has
been working for some time
on the development of
chemical warheads for these
missiles."
Dr. Danny Leshem, a
ballistics specialist at the
Tel Aviv University Center
for Strategic Studies, esti-
mates that Syria's missiles
are twice as accurate as the
Iraqi Scuds and their range
"offers launch site
possibilities throughout
Syria, to the north and to the
east."
He was surprised by the
timing of the tests and be-
lieves they were intended
primarily to send a political
message as the peace talks
move into a critical new
stage: "The Syrians want to
keep all their options open."
Israeli sources believe the
timing of the tests not only
prefigures President Assad's
options if he does not get his
way at the negotiating table,
but also underscores Syria's
close military alliance with
Iran.
Even more important than
the advanced Scuds them-
selves, the North Koreans
also have delivered the
technology and equipment
for manufacturing the
weapons, which was part of

the deal signed by Syria and
Iran.
Syria has stockpiles of
Frog, Scud-B and SS-21 mis-
siles — a lingering memory
of its old relationship with
the old Moscow — but accor-
ding to the source it is now
on the verge of making a
quantum leap by completing
a production line for large
quantities of the more soph-
isticated Scud-C missiles,
both for its own use and for
that of its Iranian ally.
Retired Gen. Aharon
Levran, an expert on the re-
gion's military balance, is
concerned not only with
Syria's acquisition of non-
conventional weapons, but
also with its growing con-
ventional arsenal.
He said Syria had acquired
hundreds of sophisticated
T-72 tanks and self-propelled
guns, while it is currently
negotiating the purchase of
advanced warplanes and an-
ti-aircraft missile systems.
Prof. Itamar Rabinovich,
who knows as much about
Syria as any Israeli, is under
no illusions about the enor-

Syria is unwilling
to acknowledge
that a more
compromising
Israeli
administration has
taken over in
Jerusalem.

mity of the business of nego-
tiating a deal with
Damascus.
Having replaced Shamir
loyalist Yossi Ben-Aharon as
head of Israel's negotiating
team with Syria, Professor
Rabinovich tempers his op-
timism about an Israeli-
Syrian accord with "the
deepest conviction that it
will be a very difficult path."
While Mr. Rabin has re-
jected a total Israeli
withdrawal from the Golan
Heights, he has left open the
door for a partial, symbolic
withdrawal: "There is room
for maneuver that will make
progress possible at the
negotiations," he told the
Labor daily Davar.
Professor Rabinovich, rec-
tor of Tel Aviv University
and professor of contem-
porary Middle East history,
said the Syrians had made
efforts — "at times violent
efforts" — to stop the Pales-
tinians from reaching a set-
tlement during the 1980s.
"Even now, they have not
ceased these efforts," he
said. "In other words, if
there is a settlement they do
not want to remain out-
side."



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